IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/wfo/wpaper/y2009i353.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

What Causes Gender Differences in the Participation and Intensity of Lifelong Learning?

Author

Listed:
  • Peter Huber
  • Ulrike Huemer

    (WIFO)

Abstract

We use recent advances in the statistical analysis of Oaxaca-Blinder decompositions for non-linear models to analyse the contribution of individual variables to total gender differences in participation and duration of training. Results suggest that effects stemming from the intra-household division of labour contribute significantly to gender differences, but that segregation of the labour market as well as differences in the access to training by tenure, age, occupation, profession and sectors are more important.

Suggested Citation

  • Peter Huber & Ulrike Huemer, 2009. "What Causes Gender Differences in the Participation and Intensity of Lifelong Learning?," WIFO Working Papers 353, WIFO.
  • Handle: RePEc:wfo:wpaper:y:2009:i:353
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.wifo.ac.at/wwa/pubid/37743
    File Function: Abstract
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Wiji Arulampalam & Alison L. Booth & Mark L. Bryan, 2004. "Training in Europe," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 2(2-3), pages 346-360, 04/05.
    2. Claudia Olivetti & Stefania Albanesi, 2005. "Home Production, Market Production and the Gender Wage Gap: Incentives and Expectations," Boston University - Department of Economics - Working Papers Series WP2005-013, Boston University - Department of Economics.
    3. David Madden, 2000. "Towards a broader explanation of male-female wage differences," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(12), pages 765-770.
    4. Ben Jann, 2005. "Standard Errors for the Blinder-Oaxaca Decomposition," German Stata Users' Group Meetings 2005 03, Stata Users Group.
    5. Andrea Bassanini & Giorgio Brunello, 2006. "Is Training More Frequent When the Wage Premium is Smaller?: Evidence from the European Community," OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers 41, OECD Publishing.
    6. Ronald L. Oaxaca & Michael R. Ransom, 1999. "Identification in Detailed Wage Decompositions," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 81(1), pages 154-157, February.
    7. Green, Francis, 1993. "The Determinants of Training of Male and Female Employees in Britain," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 55(1), pages 103-122, February.
    8. Bassanini, Andrea & Booth, Alison L. & Brunello, Giorgio & De Paola, Maria & Leuven, Edwin, 2005. "Workplace Training in Europe," IZA Discussion Papers 1640, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    9. Wiji Arulampalam & Alison L. Booth, 1997. "Who gets over the training hurdle? A study of the training experiences of young men and women in Britain," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 10(2), pages 197-217.
    10. Thomas Bauer & Mathias Sinning, 2008. "An extension of the Blinder–Oaxaca decomposition to nonlinear models," AStA Advances in Statistical Analysis, Springer;German Statistical Society, vol. 92(2), pages 197-206, May.
    11. René Böheim & Helmut Hofer & Christine Zulehner, 2007. "Wage differences between Austrian men and women: semper idem?," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 34(3), pages 213-229, July.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Agnieszka Chlon-Dominczak & Maciej Lis, 2013. "Does gender matter for lifelong learning activity?," IBS Working Papers 3/2013, Instytut Badan Strukturalnych.
    2. repec:zbw:rwirep:0320 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Agnieszka Chlon-Dominczak & Agnieszka Kaminska & Iga Magda, 2013. "Women as a Potential of the European Labour Force," IBS Policy Papers 1/2013, Instytut Badan Strukturalnych.
    4. Francisca Bauer & Rudolf Hochholzer & Peter Huber, 2010. "Arbeitskräfteumschlag, Arbeitsmarktdichte und betriebliche Weiterbildung. Erste Ergebnisse anhand des Wiener Beschäftigungs- und Qualifizierungsmonitors," WIFO Working Papers 367, WIFO.
    5. Burgard, Claudia, 2012. "Gender Differences in Further Training Participation – The Role of Individuals, Households and Firms," Ruhr Economic Papers 320, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    6. Claudia Burgard, 2012. "Gender Differences in Further Training Participation – The Role of Individuals, Households and Firms," Ruhr Economic Papers 0320, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Peter Huber & Ulrike Huemer, 2015. "Gender Differences in Lifelong Learning: An Empirical Analysis of the Impact of Marriage and Children," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 29(1), pages 32-51, March.
    2. Pfeifer, Christian & Janssen, Simon & Yang, Philip & Backes-Gellner, Uschi, 2010. "Training Participation of an Aging Workforce in an Internal Labor Market," Hannover Economic Papers (HEP) dp-447, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät.
    3. Steven McIntosh, 1999. "A Cross-Country Comparison of the Determinants of Vocational Training," CEP Discussion Papers dp0432, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    4. Jens Ruhose & Stephan L. Thomsen & Insa Weilage, 2018. "The Wider Benefits of Adult Learning: Work-Related Training and Social Capital," CESifo Working Paper Series 7268, CESifo.
    5. Ruhose, Jens & Thomsen, Stephan, 2017. "Non-Monetary Benefits of Continuous Training," VfS Annual Conference 2017 (Vienna): Alternative Structures for Money and Banking 168169, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    6. Philip Murphy & Paul L. Latreille & Melanie Jones & David Blackaby, 2008. "Is There a Public Sector Training Advantage? Evidence from the Workplace Employment Relations Survey," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 46(4), pages 674-701, December.
    7. Chung Choe & SeEun Jung & Ronald L. Oaxaca, 2020. "Identification and decompositions in probit and logit models," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 59(3), pages 1479-1492, September.
    8. Ardiana N. Gashi & Geoff Pugh & Nick Adnett, 2008. "Technological change and employer-provided training: Evidence from German establishments," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0026, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW).
    9. Sami Napari, 2008. "The Early‐career Gender Wage Gap among University Graduates in the Finnish Private Sector," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 22(4), pages 697-733, December.
    10. Sara Serra, 2016. "Temporary contracts' transitions: the role of training and institutions," Working Papers w201611, Banco de Portugal, Economics and Research Department.
    11. Richard Mussa, 2013. "Rural--urban differences in parental spending on children's primary education in Malawi," Development Southern Africa, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(6), pages 789-811, December.
    12. Wiji Arulampalam & Alison Booth & Mark Bryan, 2010. "Are there asymmetries in the effects of training on the conditional male wage distribution?," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 23(1), pages 251-272, January.
    13. Sean Archer, 2007. "The International Literature on Skills Training and the Scope for South African Application," Working Papers 07124, University of Cape Town, Development Policy Research Unit.
    14. Bassanini, Andrea & Booth, Alison L. & Brunello, Giorgio & De Paola, Maria & Leuven, Edwin, 2005. "Workplace Training in Europe," IZA Discussion Papers 1640, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    15. Owen O’Donnell & Eddy van Doorslaer & Adam Wagstaff, 2012. "Decomposition of Inequalities in Health and Health Care," Chapters, in: Andrew M. Jones (ed.), The Elgar Companion to Health Economics, Second Edition, chapter 17, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    16. Barr, Tavis & Lin, Carl, 2015. "A detailed decomposition of synthetic cohort analysis," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 127(C), pages 76-80.
    17. David Madden, 2010. "Gender Differences in Mental Well-Being: a Decomposition Analysis," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 99(1), pages 101-114, October.
    18. Ferreira, Maria & de Grip, Andries & van der Velden, Rolf, 2018. "Does informal learning at work differ between temporary and permanent workers? Evidence from 20 OECD countries," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 18-40.
    19. Peter Huber & Doris A. Oberdabernig, 2013. "Does Migration Threaten the Sustainability of European Welfare States? WWWforEurope Working Paper No. 21," WIFO Studies, WIFO, number 46882, December.
    20. Andrea Ricci & Robert Waldmann, 2015. "Firm financed training and pareto improving firing taxes," Economia Politica: Journal of Analytical and Institutional Economics, Springer;Fondazione Edison, vol. 32(2), pages 201-220, August.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    gender differences; training;

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wfo:wpaper:y:2009:i:353. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Ilse Schulz). General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/wifooat.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.