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Does gender matter for lifelong learning activity?

Author

Listed:
  • Agnieszka Chlon-Dominczak
  • Maciej Lis

Abstract

Development and maintaining skills in a life course through various lifelong learning activities is crucial to sustain employability, particularly in the context of longer working lives and more competitive economic environment. In the paper we investigate the determinants and obstacles in lifelong learning from a gender perspective. Based on the results of Labour Force Survey and Adult Education Survey we investigate the extent educational activity of adults in Europe as well as look barriers and obstacles to lifelong learning.

Suggested Citation

  • Agnieszka Chlon-Dominczak & Maciej Lis, 2013. "Does gender matter for lifelong learning activity?," IBS Working Papers 3/2013, Instytut Badan Strukturalnych.
  • Handle: RePEc:ibt:wpaper:wp032013
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    File URL: http://ibs.org.pl/files/projekty/Neujobs/NEUJOBS_03.2013_Does%20gender%20matter%20for%20lifelong%20learning%20activity.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Peter Huber & Ulrike Huemer, 2009. "What Causes Gender Differences in the Participation and Intensity of Lifelong Learning?," WIFO Working Papers 353, WIFO.
    2. Wiji Arulampalam & Alison L. Booth & Mark L. Bryan, 2004. "Training in Europe," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 2(2-3), pages 346-360, 04/05.
    3. Bassanini, Andrea & Brunello, Giorgio, 2011. "Barriers to entry, deregulation and workplace training: A theoretical model with evidence from Europe," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 55(8), pages 1152-1176.
    4. Olivier Thévenon & Nabil Ali & Willem Adema & Angelica Salvi del Pero, 2012. "Effects of Reducing Gender Gaps in Education and Labour Force Participation on Economic Growth in the OECD," OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers 138, OECD Publishing.
    5. Biagetti, Marco & Scicchitano, Sergio, 2009. "Inequality in workers’ lifelong learning across european countries: Evidence from EU-SILC data-set," MPRA Paper 17356, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Blanden, Jo & Buscha, Franz & Sturgis, Patrick & Urwin, Peter, 2010. "Measuring the returns to lifelong learning," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 28282, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    7. Christopher T. Whelan & Bertrand Maitre & Brian Nolan, 2011. "Analysing Intergenerational Influences on Income Poverty and Economic Vulnerability with EU-SILC," Working Papers 201125, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
    8. Glenda Quintini, 2011. "Over-Qualified or Under-Skilled: A Review of Existing Literature," OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers 121, OECD Publishing.
    9. Glenda Quintini, 2011. "Right for the Job: Over-Qualified or Under-Skilled?," OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers 120, OECD Publishing.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Jan Baran & Atilla Bartha & Agnieszka Chlon-Dominczak & Olena Fedyuk & Agnieszka Kaminska & Piotr Lewandowski & Maciej Lis & Iga Magda & Monika Potoczna & Violetta Zentai, 2014. "Women on the European Labour Market," IBS Policy Papers 4/2014, Instytut Badan Strukturalnych.
    2. Piotr Arak & Piotr Lewandowski & Piotr Zakowiecki, 2014. "Dual labour market in Poland – proposals for overcoming the deadlock," IBS Policy Papers 1/2014, Instytut Badan Strukturalnych.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Life-long learning; Women;

    JEL classification:

    • I29 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Other
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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