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The impacts of climate variability on welfare in rural Mexico

Author

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  • Skoufias, Emmanuel
  • Vinha, Katja
  • Conroy, Hector V.

Abstract

This paper examines the impacts of weather shocks, defined as rainfall or growing degree days more than a standard deviation from their respective long-run means, on household consumption per capita and child height-for-age. The results reveal that the current risk-coping mechanisms are not effective in protecting these two dimensions of welfare from erratic weather patterns. These findings imply that the change in the patterns of climatic variability associated with climate change is likely to reduce the effectiveness of the current coping mechanisms even more and thus increase household vulnerability further. The results reveal that weather shocks have substantial (negative as well as positive) effects on welfare that vary across regions (North vs. Center and South) and socio-economic characteristics (education and gender). The heterogeneous impacts of climatic variability suggest that a"tailored"approach to designing programs aimed at decreasing the sensitivity and increasing the capacity of rural households to adapt to climate change in Mexico is likely to be more effective.

Suggested Citation

  • Skoufias, Emmanuel & Vinha, Katja & Conroy, Hector V., 2011. "The impacts of climate variability on welfare in rural Mexico," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5555, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:5555
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Alejandro Lopez-Feldman, 2013. "Climate change, agriculture, and poverty: A household level analysis for rural Mexico," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 33(2), pages 1126-1139.
    2. Katia Alejandra Covarrubias, 2015. "The role of crop diversity in household production and food security in Uganda: A gender-differentiated analysis," FOODSECURE Working papers 32, LEI Wageningen UR.
    3. Asfaw, Solomon & Mortari, Andrea Piano & Arslan, Aslihan & Karfakis, Panagiotis & Lipper, Leslie, 2015. "Welfare Impacts of Climate Shocks: Evidence from Uganda," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 229060, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    4. Rocha, Rudi & Soares, Rodrigo R., 2015. "Water scarcity and birth outcomes in the Brazilian semiarid," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 112(C), pages 72-91.
    5. Guojun He & Jeffrey M. Perloff, 2016. "Surface Water Quality and Infant Mortality in China," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 65(1), pages 119-139.
    6. Asfaw, Solomon & Mortari, Andrea Piano & Arslan, Aslihan & Karfakis, Panagiotis & Lipper, Leslie, 2015. "Welfare Impacts of Climate Shocks: Evidence from Uganda," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 230217, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    7. Vicente Ruiz, 2017. "Do climatic events influence internal migration? Evidence from Mexico," Working Papers 2017.19, FAERE - French Association of Environmental and Resource Economists.
    8. Ayala Wineman & Nicole M. Mason & Justus Ochieng & Lilian Kirimi, 2017. "Weather extremes and household welfare in rural Kenya," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 9(2), pages 281-300, April.
    9. Bermudez, Bladimir Carrillo & Santos Branco, Danyelle Karine & Trujillo, Juan Carlos & de Lima, Joao Eustaquio, 2015. "Deforestation and Infant Health: Evidence from an Environmental Conservation Policy in Brazil," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 229064, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    10. Andalón, Mabel & Azevedo, João Pedro & Rodríguez-Castelán, Carlos & Sanfelice, Viviane & Valderrama-González, Daniel, 2016. "Weather Shocks and Health at Birth in Colombia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 82(C), pages 69-82.
    11. Lazzaroni, S. & Bedi, A.S., 2014. "Weather variability and food consumption," ISS Working Papers - General Series 51272, International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University Rotterdam (ISS), The Hague.
    12. Lazzaroni, Sara, 2013. "Weather variability and food consumption: Evidence from rural Uganda," 2013 Second Congress, June 6-7, 2013, Parma, Italy 149774, Italian Association of Agricultural and Applied Economics (AIEAA).
    13. Yonas Alem & Jonathan Colmer, 2013. "Don't Worry, Be Happy: The Welfare Cost of Climate Variability � A Subjective Well-Being Approach," GRI Working Papers 118, Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment.
    14. Foltz, Jeremy D. & Gars, Jared & Özdoğan, Mutlu & Simane, Belay & Zaitchik, Ben, 2013. "Weather and Welfare in Ethiopia," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 150298, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    15. Nkegbe, Paul Kwame & Kuunibe, Naasegnibe, 2014. "Climate variability and household welfare in northern Ghana," WIDER Working Paper Series 027, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    16. World Bank, 2012. "The Welfare Effects of Extreme Weather Events : Insights from Three APEC Case Studies," World Bank Other Operational Studies 13039, The World Bank.
    17. World Bank, 2013. "Promoting an Integral Social Protection System," World Bank Other Operational Studies 16576, The World Bank.

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    Keywords

    Health Monitoring&Evaluation; Science of Climate Change; Regional Economic Development; Global Environment Facility; Climate Change Mitigation and Green House Gases;

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