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Do climatic events influence internal migration? Evidence from Mexico

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  • Vicente Ruiz

    () (Université Paris 1 – Panthéon Sorbonne)

Abstract

A growing body of evidence suggests that changes in both environmental quality and climatic patterns influence population movements. In this paper, I provide evidence-based analysis on the effects of climatic factors on internal migration in Mexico. In particular, I focus my analysis on the role of earthquakes, hurricanes, droughts, and floods. My results show that both floods and droughts act as push factors for internal migration. In addition, my results show that socio-economic factors such as wage differentials, education levels, and violence also act as push factors.

Suggested Citation

  • Vicente Ruiz, 2017. "Do climatic events influence internal migration? Evidence from Mexico," Working Papers 2017.19, FAERE - French Association of Environmental and Resource Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:fae:wpaper:2017.19
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    File URL: http://faere.fr/pub/WorkingPapers/Ruiz_FAERE_WP2017.19.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2017
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Michel Beine & Christopher R. Parsons, 2016. "Climatic Factors as Determinants of International Migration: Redux," CREA Discussion Paper Series 16-11, Center for Research in Economic Analysis, University of Luxembourg.
    2. Michel Beine & Lionel Jeusette, 2018. "A Meta-Analysis of the Literature on Climate Change and Migration," CREA Discussion Paper Series 18-05, Center for Research in Economic Analysis, University of Luxembourg.
    3. repec:oup:cesifo:v:63:y:2017:i:4:p:386-402. is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Internal migration; Climate change; Gravity model; Mexico;

    JEL classification:

    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming
    • J11 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Demographic Trends, Macroeconomic Effects, and Forecasts

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