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Consumption Smoothing in the Zone Lacustre, Mali

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  • Sarah Harrower
  • John Hoddinott

Abstract

This paper examines consumption smoothing in the Zone Lacustre, Mali, a poor region in one of the poorest countries in the world. Idiosyncratic shocks appear to have little impact on consumption. A stronger test of consumption smoothing shows that controlling for covariate shocks, changes in household income lead to modest changes in consumption. These results are robust to concerns regarding bias resulting from measurement error or endogeneity of changes in income. Although there is no one single response, in general non-poor households are more likely to enter into new income generating activities given these shocks while poor households are more likely to engage in gift exchange or to ration consumption. Copyright 2005, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Sarah Harrower & John Hoddinott, 2005. "Consumption Smoothing in the Zone Lacustre, Mali," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 14(4), pages 489-519, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:jafrec:v:14:y:2005:i:4:p:489-519
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    Cited by:

    1. Davies, Simon & Easaw, Joshy & Ghoshray, Atanu, 2009. "Mental accounting and remittances: A study of rural Malawian households," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 321-334, June.
    2. Sebastian Linnemayr, 2010. "Consumption Smoothing and HIV/AIDS: The Case of Two Communities in South Africa," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 58(3), pages 475-506, April.
    3. Luc Christiaensen & Peter Lanjouw & Jill Luoto & David Stifel, 2012. "Small area estimation-based prediction methods to track poverty: validation and applications," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 10(2), pages 267-297, June.
    4. Abayomi Samuel Oyekale, 2015. "Access to Risk Mitigating Weather Forecasts and Changes in Farming Operations in East and West Africa: Evidence from a Baseline Survey," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 7(11), pages 1-19, October.
    5. Abla Safir, 2009. "Who leaves, who moves in? The impact of positive and negative income shocks on migration in Senegal," Working Papers halshs-00585955, HAL.
    6. Julie Litchfield & Thomas McGregor, 2008. "Poverty in Kagera, Tanzania: Characteristics, Causes and Constraints," PRUS Working Papers 42, Poverty Research Unit at Sussex, University of Sussex.
    7. Isaboke, Hezron Nyarindo & Qiao, Zhang & Nyarindo, Wilckyster Nyateko & Ke, Wang, 4. "Explaining The Perception Of Smallholders Towards Weather Index Micro-Insurance Alongside Risks And Coping Strategies," International Journal of Food and Agricultural Economics (IJFAEC), Alanya Alaaddin Keykubat University, Department of Economics and Finance, vol. 4(4).
    8. Skoufias, Emmanuel & Vinha, Katja & Conroy, Hector V., 2011. "The impacts of climate variability on welfare in rural Mexico," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5555, The World Bank.
    9. Sakurai, Takeshi & Savadogo, Kimseyinga, 2009. "Covariate Shocks and Rural Poverty in Burkina Faso," 2009 Conference, August 16-22, 2009, Beijing, China 51722, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    10. Renaud Bourlès & Bruno Ventelou & Maame Esi Woode, 2012. "Child Income as an Insurance Mechanism. Consequences for the Health-Education Relationship," Working Papers halshs-00790859, HAL.
    11. Stefan Dercon, 0. "Fate and Fear: Risk and Its Consequences in Africa," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 17(suppl_2), pages -ii127.

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