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Credit growth in emerging Europe : a cause for stability concerns?


  • Sirtaine, Sophie
  • Skamnelos, Ilias


High credit growth in Emerging Europe, generally considered a sign of catching-up with the"old"Europe, has begun receiving considerable attention among investors and policymakers alike. Given heightened global risks and the demands under the European Union accession process, the need to better understand this high credit growth's drivers, riskiness, and the possible macroeconomic and financial stability consequences is strong. The authors adopt a holistic approach in reviewing the rapid credit growth experienced in the region, examining macroeconomic, financial sector, corporate sector, and asset market consequences and possible vulnerabilities. They consider three possible scenarios-a catching-up with older European countries, a soft landing as experienced by Portugal in the early 2000s, and a hard landing as experienced by Asia in 1997.

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  • Sirtaine, Sophie & Skamnelos, Ilias, 2007. "Credit growth in emerging Europe : a cause for stability concerns?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4281, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:4281

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    Cited by:

    1. Shahbaz, Muhammad & Benkraiem, Ramzi & Miloudi, Anthony & Lahiani, Amine, 2017. "Production function with electricity consumption and policy implications in Portugal," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 110(C), pages 588-599.
    2. Brzoza-Brzezina, Michał & Chmielewski, Tomasz & Niedźwiedzińska, Joanna, 2007. "Substitution between domestic and foreign currency loans in Central Europe. Do central banks matter?," MPRA Paper 6759, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Festic, Mejra & Kavkler, Alenka & Repina, Sebastijan, 2011. "The macroeconomic sources of systemic risk in the banking sectors of five new EU member states," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 35(2), pages 310-322, February.
    4. Meixing Dai, 2012. "External Constraint and Financial Crises with Balance Sheet Effects," International Economic Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 26(4), pages 567-585, March.
    5. Mara Pirovano, 2013. "Household and firm leverage, capital flows and monetary policy in a small open economy," Working Paper Research 246, National Bank of Belgium.
    6. Masso, Jaan & Meriküll, Jaanika & Vahter, Priit, 2013. "Shift from gross profit taxation to distributed profit taxation: Are there effects on firms?," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(4), pages 1092-1105.
    7. Kalyuzhnova, Yelena & Nygaard, Christian, 2009. "Resource nationalism and credit growth in FSU countries," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(11), pages 4700-4710, November.
    8. Bruna Skarica, 2014. "Determinants of non-performing loans in Central and Eastern European countries," Financial Theory and Practice, Institute of Public Finance, vol. 38(1), pages 37-59.

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    Banks&Banking Reform; Financial Intermediation; Financial Crisis Management&Restructuring; Economic Theory&Research; Investment and Investment Climate;

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