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Foreign exchange reserves as a tool for capital account management

Author

Listed:
  • J. Scott Davis

    (Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas)

  • Ippei Fujiwara

    (Keio University and Australian National University)

  • Kevin X.D. Huang

    (Vanderbilt University)

  • Jiao Wang

    (University of Melbourne)

Abstract

Many recent theoretical papers have argued that countries can insulate themselves from volatile world capital flows by using a variable tax on foreign capital as an instrument of monetary policy. But at the same time many empirical papers have argued that only rarely do we observe these cyclical capital taxes used in practice. In this paper we present a small open economy framework where the central bank can engage in sterilized foreign exchange intervention. When private agents can freely buy and sell foreign bonds, sterilized foreign exchange intervention has no effect. But we analytically prove that when private agents cannot freely buy and sell foreign bonds, that is, under acyclical capital controls, optimal sterilized foreign exchange intervention is equivalent to an optimally chosen tax on foreign capital. Numerical simulations of the model show that a variable capital tax is a reasonable approximation for sterilized foreign exchange intervention under the levels of capital controls observed in many emerging markets.

Suggested Citation

  • J. Scott Davis & Ippei Fujiwara & Kevin X.D. Huang & Jiao Wang, 2019. "Foreign exchange reserves as a tool for capital account management," Vanderbilt University Department of Economics Working Papers 19-00004, Vanderbilt University Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:van:wpaper:vuecon-sub-19-00004
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    Cited by:

    1. J. Scott Davis & Michael B. Devereux & Changhua Yu, 2020. "Sudden Stops in Emerging Economies: The Role of World Interest Rates and Foreign Exchange Intervention," Globalization Institute Working Papers 405, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, revised 10 Sep 2021.
    2. Castillo, Paul & Medina, Juan Pablo, 2021. "Foreign Exchange Intervention, Capital Flows, and Liability Dollarization," Working Papers 2021-006, Banco Central de Reserva del Perú.
    3. Yawen Wang & Qing Wang & Zhaopeng Xing, 2022. "Climate Disaster Losses and Foreign Exchange Reserve Dynamics: Evidence of East Asia Pacific," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 14(21), pages 1-15, November.
    4. Boris Hofmann & Nikhil Patel & Steve Pak Yeung Wu, 2022. "Original sin redux: a model-based evaluation," BIS Working Papers 1004, Bank for International Settlements.
    5. Francis Breedon & Thórarinn G. Pétursson & Paolo Vitale, 2021. "The currency that came in from the cold - Capital controls and the information content of order flow," Economics wp86, Department of Economics, Central bank of Iceland.
    6. Dang, Van Dan & Huynh, Japan, 2022. "Monetary policy and bank performance: The role of business models," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 59(C).
    7. Lama, Ruy & Medina, Juan Pablo, 2020. "Mundell meets Poole: Managing capital flows with multiple instruments in emerging economies," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 109(C).
    8. Faltermeier, Julia & Lama, Ruy & Medina, Juan Pablo, 2022. "Foreign exchange intervention for commodity booms and busts," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 143(C).
    9. Lihui Wang & Zhihong Liu & Huailong Shi, 2022. "The Impact of the Pilot Free Trade Zone on Regional Financial Development," China & World Economy, Institute of World Economics and Politics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 30(5), pages 154-184, September.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Central bank; Small open economy; foreign exchange reserves; capital controls;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E5 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit
    • F4 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance

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