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Personality traits, migration intentions, and cultural distance

Author

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  • Fouarge, Didier

    (ROA / Dynamics of the labour market, RS: GSBE DUHR, RS: GSBE Theme Data-Driven Decision-Making, RS: GSBE Theme Learning and Work)

  • Özer, Merve Nezihe

    (General Economics 0 (Onderwijs), RS: GSBE DUHR)

  • Seegers, Philipp

    (Macro, International & Labour Economics, RS: GSBE DUHR)

Abstract

Personality traits are influential in individual decision-making but have been overlooked in economic models of migration. This paper investigates the relation between Big Five personality traits and individuals’ migration intentions among alternative destinations that vary in their culture distance. We hypothesize that Big Five personality traits may alter individuals’ migration decision and destination choice through their influence on perceived psychic costs and benefits of migration. We test our hypotheses using the Fachkraft survey conducted among university students in Germany. We find that extraversion and openness are positively associated with migration intentions, while agreeableness, conscientiousness, and emotional stability negatively relate to migration intentions. We show that openness positively and extraversion negatively relate to the willingness to move to culturally distant countries even when we control for geographic distance and economic differences between countries. Using language as a cultural distance indicator provides evidence that extravert individuals are less likely to prefer linguistically distant countries while agreeable individuals are more inclined to consider such countries as alternative destinations.

Suggested Citation

  • Fouarge, Didier & Özer, Merve Nezihe & Seegers, Philipp, 2018. "Personality traits, migration intentions, and cultural distance," Research Memorandum 028, Maastricht University, Graduate School of Business and Economics (GSBE).
  • Handle: RePEc:unm:umagsb:2018028
    DOI: 10.26481/umagsb.2018028
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    3. Elena Samarsky, 2020. "Who is Thinking of Leaving Germany? The Role of Postmaterialism, Risk Attitudes, and Life-Satisfaction on Emigration Intentions of German Nationals," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 1066, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D91 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Role and Effects of Psychological, Emotional, Social, and Cognitive Factors on Decision Making
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • Z10 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - General

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