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Do The Best Graduates Leave The Peripheral Areas Of The Netherlands?

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  • VIKTOR VENHORST
  • JOUKE VAN DIJK
  • LEO VAN WISSEN

Abstract

There is more and more empirical evidence to show that highly skilled people are an important determinant of economic growth. Consequently, policy-makers are eager to keep their graduates in the region or attract graduates from elsewhere. It is also well known that people with a higher level of education exhibit high rates of spatial mobility. Much less is known about mobility patterns according to discipline and academic grade. Do the best people stay or leave, and does this vary according to discipline and type of region? This paper investigates the relationship between ability, field of study and spatial mobility using a micro‐dataset on Dutch university and college graduates. The findings indicate that there are substantial net flows mainly towards the economic centre of the Netherlands, but that there are also flows between peripheral regions and to other countries. The paper finds that university graduates are more spatially mobile than vocational college level graduates and that when one looks at spatial behaviour according to discipline, there are also striking differences between graduates. This, however, does not necessarily mean that peripheral regions also lose their best graduates. For several disciplines, employers in the peripheral areas are able to retain the graduates with the highest grades, contrary to what the standard human capital framework predicts. However, the study finds that if graduates leave the region, those with the highest grades are more likely to move abroad.

Suggested Citation

  • Viktor Venhorst & Jouke Van Dijk & Leo Van Wissen, 2010. "Do The Best Graduates Leave The Peripheral Areas Of The Netherlands?," Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie, Royal Dutch Geographical Society KNAG, vol. 101(5), pages 521-537, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:tvecsg:v:101:y:2010:i:5:p:521-537
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/j.1467-9663.2010.00629.x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Raúl Ramos & Esteban Sanromá, 2013. "Overeducation and Local Labour Markets in Spain," Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie, Royal Dutch Geographical Society KNAG, vol. 104(3), pages 278-291, July.
    2. Viktor A. Venhorst, 2013. "Graduate Migration and Regional Familiarity," Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie, Royal Dutch Geographical Society KNAG, vol. 104(1), pages 109-119, February.
    3. Raul Ramos & Vicente Royuela, 2017. "Graduate migration in Spain: the impact of the Great Recession on a low-mobility country," Chapters,in: Graduate Migration and Regional Development, chapter 8, pages 159-172 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    4. Carree, Martin & Kronenberg, Kristin, 2012. "Locational choices and the costs of distance: empirical evidence for Dutch graduates," MPRA Paper 36221, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Dijk, J. van & Broersma, L. & Edzes, A.J.E. & Venhorst, V.A, 2011. "Brain drain of brain gain? Hoger opgeleiden in grote steden in Nederland," Research Reports vavenhorst, University of Groningen, Urban and Regional Studies Institute (URSI).
    6. Venhorst, V. & Cörvers, F., 2015. "Entry into working life: Spatial mobility and the job match quality of higher-educated graduates," ROA Research Memorandum 003, Maastricht University, Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market (ROA).
    7. repec:spr:anresc:v:59:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s00168-016-0753-x is not listed on IDEAS
    8. repec:spr:anresc:v:59:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s00168-016-0773-6 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Herbst, Mikolaj & Kaczmarczyk, Pawel & Wojcik, Piotr, 2014. "Migration of Graduates within a Sequential Decision Framework: Evidence from Poland," IZA Discussion Papers 8573, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    10. Herbst, Mikolaj & Rok, Jakub, 2013. "Mobility of human capital and its effect on regional economic development. Review of theory and empirical literature," MPRA Paper 45755, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. repec:spr:anresc:v:59:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s00168-017-0845-2 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Fabian Kratz, 2011. "Is spatial mobility a reproduction mechanism of inequality? An empirical analysis of the job search behavior and the international mobility of students and re-cent graduates," Working Papers 26, AlmaLaurea Inter-University Consortium.

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