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Serempathy: A New Approach To Innovation. An Application To Forty-Six Regions Of Atlantic Arc Countries

  • Pablo COTO-MILLÁN

    ()

    (University of Cantabria, Spain)

  • Miguel Ángel PESQUERA

    ()

    (University of Cantabria, Spain)

  • Pedro CASARES-HONTAÑÓN

    ()

    (University of Cantabria, Spain)

  • Pablo DE CASTRO

    ()

    (University of Cantabria, Spain)

This research provides a new theoretical approach to innovation called Serempathy: Serendipity (which is achieved by chance) + Empathy (putting your self in the other). Serempathy relies on collaborative relationships between: University, private companies and public administration. In this theoretical approach adds chance to scientific discovery and an environment of empathy. Ideas aren’t self-contained things; they’re more like ecosystems and networks. The work also provides data processed in recent years (2004-2006) for forty six Atlantic Arc Regions (the forty regions of countries: United Kindong, France, Portugal and Spain), overall and in different clusters, providing relevant empirical evidence on the relationship between Human Capital, Technological Platform, Innovation, Serempathy and Output. In the econometric and statistical modeling is considered especially for forty regions

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Article provided by ScientificPapers.org in its journal Journal of Knowledge Management, Economics and Information Technology.

Volume (Year): 1 (2011)
Issue (Month): 6 (October)
Pages: 26

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Handle: RePEc:spp:jkmeit:1187
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