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Labor migration, human capital agglomeration and regional development in China

  • Fu, Yuming
  • Gabriel, Stuart A.

We estimate a skill-based directional migration model to assess the effects of regional human capital agglomeration on labor migration in China. Upon accounting for regional differentials in skill-based compensation, cost-of-living, amenities, and the like, model estimates indicate the importance of destination human capital concentration to high-skill migrants. In marked contrast, low-skill migrants are found to have little incentive to co-locate with high-skill workers, likely reflecting institutional and other impediments to human capital investment among low-skill migrants. Research findings suggest the importance of human capital agglomeration benefits to disparate regional growth trajectories in China.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Regional Science and Urban Economics.

Volume (Year): 42 (2012)
Issue (Month): 3 ()
Pages: 473-484

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Handle: RePEc:eee:regeco:v:42:y:2012:i:3:p:473-484
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