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Human Capital in Cities and Suburbs


  • Stolarick, Kevin

    () (University of Toronto)

  • Mellander, Charlotta

    () (Jönköping International Business School)

  • Florida, Richard

    () (University of Toronto)


Research on human capital generally focuses on the regional level, and neglects the relative effects of its distribution between center cities and surrounding suburbs. This research examines the effects of this intra-metropolitan distribution on economic performance. The findings indicate that this distribution matters significantly to US regional performance. Suburban human capital matters more than center city human capital. However, this varies by regional size. Suburban human capital has the biggest effect on regional economic performance in smaller and medium size metros. Center city human capital has a relatively larger effect on economic performance in regions with over one million people.

Suggested Citation

  • Stolarick, Kevin & Mellander, Charlotta & Florida, Richard, 2012. "Human Capital in Cities and Suburbs," Working Paper Series in Economics and Institutions of Innovation 264, Royal Institute of Technology, CESIS - Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:cesisp:0264

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item


    Human Capital; Density; Intra-metropolitan distribution; Income; Housing prices;

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • O30 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - General
    • R10 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - General
    • R20 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - General

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