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What affects international migration of European science and engineering graduates?

  • Andries de Grip
  • Didier Fouarge
  • Jan Sauermann

Using a data set of science and engineering graduates from 12 European countries, we analyse the determinants of labour migration after graduation. We find that not only wage gains are driving the migration decision, but also differences in labour market opportunities, past migration experience and international student exchange are strong predictors of future migration. Contrary to our expectations, job characteristics such as the utilisation of skills in the job and involvement in innovation hardly affect the migration decision. When analysing country choice, countries such as the USA, Canada and Australia appear to attract migrants due to their larger R&D intensity. Moreover, graduates with higher grades are more likely to migrate to these countries.

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Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Economics of Innovation and New Technology.

Volume (Year): 19 (2010)
Issue (Month): 5 ()
Pages: 407-421

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Handle: RePEc:taf:ecinnt:v:19:y:2010:i:5:p:407-421
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