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Where Do the Brainy Italians Go?

In: The Labour Market Impact of the EU Enlargement. A New Regional Geography of Europe?

Author

Listed:
  • Amelie F. Constant

    (DIW)

  • Elena D’Agosto

    (Ministero delle Finanze, Italia)

Abstract

This paper studies the major determinants that affect the country location of university-educated Italian scientists and researchers who live abroad in three alternative geographic areas: the USA/Canada, the UK and other EU countries. In our sample, 38% of the brainy Italians are in other EU countries, 37% in the USA and 25% in the UK. Ceteris paribus, both push and pull factors are important: having a PhD from outside Italy predicts settling in the UK, while having extra working experience from outside Italy predicts migration to other EU countries. Specialization in the fields of humanities, social sciences and health are strong determinants of migration to the UK. For the move to the USA, specialization in the humanities is a significant deterrent, while specialization in health is a positive deciding factor. Those who stay abroad for less than two years, or for two to four years are definitely more likely to go to the UK. Lack of funds in Italy constitutes a significant push to the USA.

Suggested Citation

  • Amelie F. Constant & Elena D’Agosto, 2010. "Where Do the Brainy Italians Go?," AIEL Series in Labour Economics,in: Floro Ernesto Caroleo & Francesco Pastore (ed.), The Labour Market Impact of the EU Enlargement. A New Regional Geography of Europe?, edition 1, chapter 10, pages 247-271 AIEL - Associazione Italiana Economisti del Lavoro.
  • Handle: RePEc:ail:chapts:04-10
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    Cited by:

    1. John Gibson & David McKenzie, 2012. "The Economic Consequences of ‘Brain Drain’ of the Best and Brightest: Microeconomic Evidence from Five Countries," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 122(560), pages 339-375, May.
    2. Peter Huber & Klaus Nowotny & Julia Bock-Schappelwein, 2010. "Qualification Structure, Over- and Under-qualification of the Foreign Born in Austria and the EU," WIFO Studies, WIFO, number 41226.
    3. Andries de Grip & Didier Fouarge & Jan Sauermann, 2010. "What affects international migration of European science and engineering graduates?," Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(5), pages 407-421.
    4. Richard B. Freeman, 2010. "What Does Global Expansion of Higher Education Mean for the United States?," NBER Chapters,in: American Universities in a Global Market, pages 373-404 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Klaus Nowotny, 2011. "Welfare Magnets, Taxation and the Location Decisions of Migrants to the EU," ERSA conference papers ersa11p133, European Regional Science Association.
    6. Gibson, John & McKenzie, David, 2014. "Scientific mobility and knowledge networks in high emigration countries: Evidence from the Pacific," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 43(9), pages 1486-1495.
    7. Rosalind S Hunter, 2009. "The Elite Brain Drain," Working Papers id:2048, eSocialSciences.
    8. Wido Geis & Silke Uebelmesser & Martin Werding, 2013. "How do Migrants Choose Their Destination Country? An Analysis of Institutional Determinants," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 21(5), pages 825-840, November.
    9. Sari Pekkala Kerr & William R. Kerr, 2011. "Economic Impacts of Immigration: A Survey," Finnish Economic Papers, Finnish Economic Association, vol. 24(1), pages 1-32, Spring.
    10. repec:wfo:wstudy:41563 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Edward Bergman, 2011. "Hirschmann Mobility Among Academics of Highly Ranked EU Research Universities," ERSA conference papers ersa11p1134, European Regional Science Association.
    12. RosalindS. Hunter & Andrew J. Oswald & Bruce G. Charlton, 2009. "The Elite Brain Drain," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 119(538), pages 231-251, June.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Brain drain; skilled migration; Italy; push-pull factors.;

    JEL classification:

    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration

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