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What Does Global Expansion of Higher Education Mean for the United States?

In: American Universities in a Global Market

  • Richard B. Freeman

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This chapter was published in:
  • Charles T. Clotfelter, 2010. "American Universities in a Global Market," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number clot08-1, October.
  • This item is provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Chapters with number 11602.
    Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:11602
    Contact details of provider: Postal: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA 02138, U.S.A.
    Phone: 617-868-3900
    Web page: http://www.nber.org
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    1. Amelie Constant & Elena D'Agosto, 2008. "Where Do the Brainy Italians Go?," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 763, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
      • Amelie F. Constant & Elena D’Agosto, 2010. "Where Do the Brainy Italians Go?," AIEL Series in Labour Economics, in: Floro Ernesto Caroleo & Francesco Pastore (ed.), The Labour Market Impact of the EU Enlargement. A New Regional Geography of Europe?, edition 1, chapter 10, pages 247-271 AIEL - Associazione Italiana Economisti del Lavoro.
    2. Gene M. Grossman & Esteban Rossi-Hansberg, 2006. "Trading Tasks: A Simple Theory of Offshoring," NBER Working Papers 12721, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Roy J. Ruffin & Ronald W. Jones, 2007. "International Technology Transfer: Who Gains and Who Loses?," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 15(2), pages 209-222, 05.
    4. Axel Dreher & Panu Poutvaara, 2005. "Student Flows and Migration: An Empirical Analysis," CESifo Working Paper Series 1490, CESifo Group Munich.
    5. Thomas J. Holmes & Julia Thornton Snider, 2009. "A Theory of Outsourcing and Wage Decline," NBER Working Papers 14856, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Matthias Parey & Fabian Waldinger, 2007. "Studying Abroad and the Effect on International Labor Market Mobility: Evidence from the Introduction of Erasmus," CEE Discussion Papers 0086, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
    7. Andries de Grip & Didier Fouarge & Jan Sauermann, 2010. "What affects international migration of European science and engineering graduates?," Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(5), pages 407-421.
    8. George J. Borjas, 2006. "Immigration in High-Skill Labor Markets: The Impact of Foreign Students on the Earnings of Doctorates," NBER Working Papers 12085, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Richard B. Freeman, 1975. "Overinvestment in College Training?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 10(3), pages 287-311.
    10. Adam B. Jaffe & Josh Lerner & Scott Stern (ed.), 2006. "Innovation Policy and the Economy, Volume 6," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 6, number 0262101181, June.
    11. Hessel Oosterbeek & Dinand Webbink, 2011. "Does Studying Abroad Induce a Brain Drain?," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 78(310), pages 347-366, 04.
    12. Paul A. Samuelson, 2004. "Where Ricardo and Mill Rebut and Confirm Arguments of Mainstream Economists Supporting Globalization," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 18(3), pages 135-146, Summer.
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