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Globalization of scientific and engineering talent: international mobility of students, workers, and ideas and the world economy

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  • Richard Freeman

Abstract

This paper documents the five main ways in which globalization of scientific and engineering has proceeded: (1) expansion of mass higher education worldwide; (2) growth in number of international students; (3) immigration of scientists and engineers; (4) non-immigration trips: academic visitors, conferences; (5) greater international co-authorship and co-patenting. It is argued that by accelerating the rate of technological change and speeding the adoption of best practices around the world, these developments should benefit advanced and developing countries but that they threaten the comparative advantage of advanced countries in high-tech sectors and the edge that their citizens have in access to the highest quality university education and jobs; and risk creating greater divisions between modern and traditional sectors in developing countries. How economies around the world take advantage of the benefits and minimize the costs of globalization of knowledge will be a major determinant of economic progress.

Suggested Citation

  • Richard Freeman, 2010. "Globalization of scientific and engineering talent: international mobility of students, workers, and ideas and the world economy," Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(5), pages 393-406.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:ecinnt:v:19:y:2010:i:5:p:393-406
    DOI: 10.1080/10438590903432871
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Thomas J. Holmes & Julia Thornton Snider, 2009. "A Theory of Outsourcing and Wage Decline," NBER Working Papers 14856, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. George J. Borjas, 2009. "Immigration in High-Skill Labor Markets: The Impact of Foreign Students on the Earnings of Doctorates," NBER Chapters,in: Science and Engineering Careers in the United States: An Analysis of Markets and Employment, pages 131-161 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Maria Rosaria Carillo & Erasmo Papagni, 2013. "Is the ‘Globalization’ of Science Always Good for Scientific Productivity and Economic Growth?," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 64(4), pages 607-644, November.
    2. Stefano Breschi & Francesco Lissoni & Gianluca Tarasconi, 2014. "Inventor Data for Research on Migration and Innovation: A Survey and a Pilot," WIPO Economic Research Working Papers 17, World Intellectual Property Organization - Economics and Statistics Division.
    3. Baruffaldi, Stefano H. & Di Maio, Giorgio & Landoni, Paolo, 2017. "Determinants of PhD holders’ use of social networking sites: An analysis based on LinkedIn," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 46(4), pages 740-750.
    4. Marina Murat, 2013. "Education ties and investments abroad. Empirical evidence from the US and UK," Center for Economic Research (RECent) 091, University of Modena and Reggio E., Dept. of Economics "Marco Biagi".
    5. repec:mod:depeco:0014 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Jin, Wei, 2015. "Can China harness globalization to reap domestic carbon savings? Modeling international technology diffusion in a multi-region framework," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 64-82.
    7. Carillo, Maria Rosaria & Papagni, Erasmo & Sapio, Alessandro, 2013. "Do collaborations enhance the high-quality output of scientific institutions? Evidence from the Italian Research Assessment Exercise," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 25-36.
    8. Francesco LISSONI, 2016. "Migration and Innovation Diffusion : An Eclectic Survey," Cahiers du GREThA 2016-11, Groupe de Recherche en Economie Théorique et Appliquée.
    9. repec:spr:scient:v:114:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s11192-017-2573-x is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Lepori, B. & Seeber, M. & Bonaccorsi, A., 2015. "Competition for talent. Country and organizational-level effects in the internationalization of European higher education institutions," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(3), pages 789-802.
    11. Jürgen Janger & Agnes Kügler & Andreas Reinstaller & Fabian Unterlass, 2017. "Austria 2025 – Measuring and Determining the Frontier in Science, Technology, Innovation and Economy," WIFO Monatsberichte (monthly reports), WIFO, vol. 90(2), pages 141-151, February.
    12. N. N., 2017. "WIFO-Monatsberichte, no 2/2017," WIFO Monatsberichte (monthly reports), WIFO, vol. 90(2), February.
    13. Richard B. Freeman, 2013. "One Ring to Rule Them All? Globalization of Knowledge and Knowledge Creation," NBER Working Papers 19301, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    14. repec:oup:jecgeo:v:17:y:2017:i:5:p:1009-1038. is not listed on IDEAS

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