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Does Studying Abroad Induce a Brain Drain?

Author

Listed:
  • HESSEL OOSTERBEEK
  • DINAND WEBBINK

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Hessel Oosterbeek & Dinand Webbink, 2011. "Does Studying Abroad Induce a Brain Drain?," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 78(310), pages 347-366, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:econom:v:78:y:2011:i:310:p:347-366
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Giorgio Di Pietro, 2015. "Do Study Abroad Programs Enhance the Employability of Graduates?," Education Finance and Policy, MIT Press, vol. 10(2), pages 223-243, March.
    2. Silke Uebelmesser & Marcel Gérard, 2014. "Financing Higher Education when Students and Graduates are Internationally Mobile," Jena Economic Research Papers 2014-009, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
    3. Di Pietro, Giorgio, 2012. "Does studying abroad cause international labor mobility? Evidence from Italy," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 117(3), pages 632-635.
    4. Matthias Parey & Fabian Waldinger, 2011. "Studying Abroad and the Effect on International Labour Market Mobility: Evidence from the Introduction of ERASMUS," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 121(551), pages 194-222, March.
    5. Govert E. Bijwaard & Qi Wang, 2016. "Return Migration of Foreign Students," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 32(1), pages 31-54, February.
    6. Daniëlle Bertrand-Cloodt & Frank Cörvers & Hans Heijke, 2017. "Ability, Academic Climate, and Going Abroad for Work or Pursuing a PhD," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 63(1), pages 119-140.
    7. repec:spr:anresc:v:59:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s00168-016-0762-9 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Mabel Sanchez-Barrioluengo & Sara Flisi, 2017. "Student Mobility in Tertiary Education: institutional factors and regional attractiveness," JRC Working Papers JRC108895, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).
    9. Giuseppe Sorrenti, 2017. "The Spanish or the German Apartment? Study Abroad and the Acquisition of Permanent Skills," CHILD Working Papers Series 46 JEL Classification: I2, Centre for Household, Income, Labour and Demographic Economics (CHILD) - CCA.
    10. Giorgio Di Pietro, 2014. "University study abroad and graduates' employability," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 109-109, December.
    11. Haupt, Alexander & Krieger, Tim & Lange, Thomas, 2013. "Education policy, student migration, and brain gain," Discussion Paper Series 2013-05, University of Freiburg, Wilfried Guth Endowed Chair for Constitutional Political Economy and Competition Policy.
    12. Herbst, Mikolaj & Rok, Jakub, 2013. "Mobility of human capital and its effect on regional economic development. Review of theory and empirical literature," MPRA Paper 45755, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    13. Giorgia Casalone & Carmen Aina, 2011. "Does time-to-degree matter? The effect of delayed graduation on employment and wages," Working Papers 38, AlmaLaurea Inter-University Consortium.
    14. Richard B. Freeman, 2010. "What Does Global Expansion of Higher Education Mean for the United States?," NBER Chapters,in: American Universities in a Global Market, pages 373-404 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    15. repec:eee:ecoedu:v:60:y:2017:i:c:p:142-158 is not listed on IDEAS

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