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Where is the Destination? Understanding the Determinants of International Students’ Destination Choices upon Graduation in Ireland

Author

Listed:
  • Zizhen Wang

    (School of Social Policy, Social Work and Social Justice & Geary Institute for Public Policy, University College Dublin, Ireland)

  • Philip J O'Connell

    (School of Social Policy, Social Work and Social Justice & Geary Institute for Public Policy, University College Dublin, Ireland)

Abstract

This study investigates the extent to which human capital and social capital may influence the likelihood of staying abroad or returning home upon graduation for international students in Ireland. The number of students from developing countries who migrate to pursue a tertiary degree in developed countries is notably high in recent years. Their choices of staying in the west or returning home upon graduation have strong impacts both on their personal career chances as well as on the economic prospects of both host and home countries. Instead of surveying among on-campus students, a survey was carried out during October 2017 to February 2018 among international alumni of Irish universities in order to collect information about their first-job location upon graduation. The main findings include: (1) human capital, especially degree major and language ability, is positively associated with the likelihood of staying abroad, (2) bridging social capital, especially bridging ties embedded with resources, is positively associated with the likelihood of staying abroad, while bonding social capital has no significant effect.

Suggested Citation

  • Zizhen Wang & Philip J O'Connell, 2018. "Where is the Destination? Understanding the Determinants of International Students’ Destination Choices upon Graduation in Ireland," Working Papers 201814, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucd:wpaper:201814
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    File URL: http://www.ucd.ie/geary/static/publications/workingpapers/gearywp201814.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2018
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Baruch, Yehuda & Budhwar, Pawan S. & Khatri, Naresh, 2007. "Brain drain: Inclination to stay abroad after studies," Journal of World Business, Elsevier, vol. 42(1), pages 99-112, March.
    2. Todaro, Michael P, 1969. "A Model for Labor Migration and Urban Unemployment in Less Developed Countries," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 59(1), pages 138-148, March.
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    5. Matthias Parey & Fabian Waldinger, 2011. "Studying Abroad and the Effect on International Labour Market Mobility: Evidence from the Introduction of ERASMUS," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 121(551), pages 194-222, March.
    6. Christian Dustmann & Francesca Fabbri, 2003. "Language proficiency and labour market performance of immigrants in the UK," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 113(489), pages 695-717, July.
    7. Hessel Oosterbeek & Dinand Webbink, 2011. "Does Studying Abroad Induce a Brain Drain?," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 78(310), pages 347-366, April.
    8. Andries de Grip & Didier Fouarge & Jan Sauermann, 2010. "What affects international migration of European science and engineering graduates?," Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(5), pages 407-421.
    9. Massey, Douglas S. & Arango, Joaquin & Hugo, Graeme & Kouaouci, Ali & Pellegrino, Adela & Taylor, J. Edward, 1999. "Worlds in Motion: Understanding International Migration at the End of the Millennium," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198294429.
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    Keywords

    international students; migration choices; human capital; social capital; Ireland.;

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