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Worlds in Motion: Understanding International Migration at the End of the Millennium

Author

Listed:
  • Massey, Douglas S.

    (University of Pennsylvania)

  • Arango, Joaquin

    (Instituto Universitario Ortgea y Gasset)

  • Hugo, Graeme

    (University of Adelaide)

  • Kouaouci, Ali

    (Lecturer, Department of Demography)

  • Pellegrino, Adela
  • Taylor, J. Edward

    (University of California, Davis)

Abstract

At the end of the 20th century nearly all developed nations have become countries of immigration, absorbing growing numbers of immigrants not only from developed regions, byt increasingly from developing nations of the Third World. Although international migration has come to play a central role in the social, economic, and demographic dynamics of both immigrant-sending and immigrant-receiving countries, social scientist have been slow to construct a comprehensive theory to explain it. Efforts at theoretical explanation have been fragmented by disciplinary, geographic, and methodological boudaries. Worlds in Motion seeks to overcome these schisms to create a comprehensive theory of international migration for the next century. After explicating the various propositions and hypotheses of current theories, and identifying area of complementarity and conflict, the authors review empirical research emanting from each of the world's principal international migration systems: North America, Western Europe, the Gulf, Asia and the Pacific, and the Southern Cone of South America. Using data from the 1980s, levels and patterns of migration within each system are described to define their structure and organization. Specific studies are then comprehensively surveyed to evaluate the fundamental propositions of neoclassical economics, the new economics of labour migration, segmented labour market theory, world systems theory, social capital theory, and the theory of cumulative causation. The various theories are also tested by applying them to the relationship between international migration and economic development. Although certain theories seem to function more effectively in certain systems, all contain elements of truth supported by empirical research. The task of the theorist is thus to identify which theories are most effective in accounting for international migration in the world today, and what regional and national circumstances lead to a predominance of one theoretical mechanism over another. The book concludes by offering an empirically-grounded theoretical synthesis to serve as a guide for researchers and policy-makers in the 21st century.

Suggested Citation

  • Massey, Douglas S. & Arango, Joaquin & Hugo, Graeme & Kouaouci, Ali & Pellegrino, Adela & Taylor, J. Edward, 1999. "Worlds in Motion: Understanding International Migration at the End of the Millennium," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198294429.
  • Handle: RePEc:oxp:obooks:9780198294429
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Luthra, Renee Reichl & Platt, Lucinda & Salamonska, Justyna, 2014. "Migrant diversity, migration motivations and early integration: the case of Poles in Germany, the Netherlands, London and Dublin," ISER Working Paper Series 2014-18, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    2. Luthra, Renee & Platt, Lucinda & Salamońska, Justyna, 2014. "Migrant diversity, migration motivations and early integration: the case of Poles in Germany, the Netherlands, London and Dublin," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 57605, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    3. Julia Gelatt, 2013. "Looking Down or Looking Up: Status and Subjective Well-Being among Asian and Latino Immigrants in the United States," International Migration Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(1), pages 39-75, March.
    4. Frere-Smith, Tom & Luthra, Renee Reichl & Platt, Lucinda, 2014. "Sampling recently arrived immigrants in the UK: exploring the effectiveness of Respondent Driven Sampling," ISER Working Paper Series 2014-25, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    5. Renee Luthra & Lucinda Platt & Justyna Salamońska, 2004. "Migrant diversity, migration motivations and early integration: the case of Poles in Germany, the Netherlands, London and Dublin," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1412, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
    6. Randall Kuhn & Bethany Everett & Rachel Silvey, 2011. "The Effects of Children’s Migration on Elderly Kin’s Health: A Counterfactual Approach," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 48(1), pages 183-209, February.
    7. repec:dem:demres:v:37:y:2017:i:53 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. repec:spr:izamig:v:7:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1186_s40176-017-0097-z is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Tom Frere-Smith & Renee Luthra & Lucinda Platt, 2014. "Sampling Recently Arrived Immigrants in the UK: Exploring the effectiveness of Respondent Driven Sampling," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1432, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
    10. Margherita Comola & Mariapia Mendola, 2013. "The Formation of Migrant Networks," Development Working Papers 353, Centro Studi Luca d'Agliano, University of Milano.
    11. Guy Abel, 2013. "Estimating global migration flow tables using place of birth data," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 28(18), pages 505-546, March.
    12. Hendrik P. van Dalen & George Groenewold & Tineke Fokkema, 2005. "Remittances and their Effect on Emigration Intentions in Egypt, Morocco and Turkey," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 05-030/1, Tinbergen Institute.
    13. Renee Luthra & Lucinda Platt & Justyna Salamonska, 2014. "Migrant diversity, migration motivations and early integration: the case of Poles in Germany, the Netherlands, London and Dublin," LEQS – LSE 'Europe in Question' Discussion Paper Series 74, European Institute, LSE.
    14. Lucinda Platt & Renee Luthra & Tom Frere-Smith, 2015. "Adapting chain referral methods to sample new migrants," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 33(24), pages 665-700, September.
    15. Renee Luthra & Lucinda Platt & Justyna Salamonska, 2014. "Migrant diversity, migration motivations and early integration: the case of Poles in Germany, the Netherlands, London and Dublin," Europe in Question Discussion Paper Series of the London School of Economics (LEQs) 4, London School of Economics / European Institute.

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