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Remittances and their Effect on Emigration Intentions in Egypt, Morocco and Turkey

Author

Listed:
  • Hendrik P. van Dalen

    () (Erasmus Universiteit Rotterdam, and Netherlands Interdisciplinary Demographic Institute (NIDI))

  • George Groenewold

    () (NIDI)

  • Tineke Fokkema

    () (NIDI)

Abstract

What determines remittances – altruism or enlightened self-interest - and do remittances trigger additional migration? These two questions are examined empirically in Egypt, Turkey and Morocco for households with family members living abroad. Results show, first, that one cannot clearly pinpoint altruistic or motives of self-interest since each country tells a different story and within a country both motives can be defended as driving forces behind remittance behaviour. A general conclusion based on a multi-country study is that the family ties and the net earnings potential of emigrants have stronger effects on receipt of remittances than net earnings potential of households in the country of origin. Second, the receipt of remittances has a positive effect on emigration intentions of household members living in the country of origin. Therefore, receipt of remittances may contribute to new flows of migration, in particular in the case of Morocco.

Suggested Citation

  • Hendrik P. van Dalen & George Groenewold & Tineke Fokkema, 2005. "Remittances and their Effect on Emigration Intentions in Egypt, Morocco and Turkey," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 05-030/1, Tinbergen Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:tin:wpaper:20050030
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Maëlan Le Goff & Sara Salomone, 2016. "Remittances and the Changing Composition of Migration," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 39(4), pages 513-529, April.
    2. Claudine Attias-Donfut & François-Charles Wolff & Philippe Tessier, 2005. "Les transferts intergénérationnels des migrants âgés," Économie et Statistique, Programme National Persée, vol. 390(1), pages 3-23.
    3. Richter, Susan M., 2008. "The Insurance Role of Remittances on Household Credit Demand," 2008 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2008, Orlando, Florida 6261, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    4. Laetitia Duval & François-Charles Wolff, 2016. "Emigration intentions of Roma: evidence from Central and South-East Europe," Post-Communist Economies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 28(1), pages 87-107, January.
    5. Radu Vranceanu & Claire Naiditch, 2009. "Migratory equilibria with invested remittances," Post-Print hal-00553550, HAL.
    6. World Bank, 2006. "Fostering Higher Growth and Employment in the Kingdom of Morocco," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 7114, July.
    7. Davies, Simon, 2007. "Remittances as insurance for idiosyncratic and covariate shocks in Malawi: The importance of distance and relationship," MPRA Paper 4463, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Walkenhorst, Peter & Malouche, Mariem, 2006. "Trade Policy and Export Performance in Morocco," MPRA Paper 23119, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Matloob Piracha & Teresa Randazzo, 2011. "Remittances and Return Migration," Studies in Economics 1118, School of Economics, University of Kent.
    10. Diagne, Youssoupha S & Diane, Fatou, 2008. "Impact Des Transferts Des Migrants Sur La Pauvreté Au Sénégal
      [Impact of international workers' remittances on poverty in Senegal]
      ," MPRA Paper 54866, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. Tigran A. Melkonyan & David A. Grigorian & J. Scott Shonkwiler, 2008. "Garbage In, Gospel Out? Controlling for the Underreporting of Remittances," IMF Working Papers 08/230, International Monetary Fund.
    12. Al-Mashat Rania & Billmeier Andreas, 2012. "Push or Pull? The Determinants of Remittances to Egypt," Review of Middle East Economics and Finance, De Gruyter, vol. 8(2), pages 1-27, October.
    13. Simon Davies, 2011. "What Motivates Gifts? Intra-Family Transfers in Rural Malawi," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 32(3), pages 473-492, September.
    14. Piracha, Matloob & Saraogi, Amrita, 2013. "Remittances and Migration Intentions of the Left-Behind," IZA Discussion Papers 7779, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    15. Avato, Johanna, 2009. "Migration pressures and immigration policies : new evidence on the selection of migrants," Social Protection and Labor Policy and Technical Notes 52449, The World Bank.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Remittances; migration; intentions; altruism; self-interest; networks;

    JEL classification:

    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation
    • D85 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Network Formation
    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • N37 - Economic History - - Labor and Consumers, Demography, Education, Health, Welfare, Income, Wealth, Religion, and Philanthropy - - - Africa; Oceania
    • O16 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Financial Markets; Saving and Capital Investment; Corporate Finance and Governance

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