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Hirschmann Mobility Among Academics of Highly Ranked EU Research Universities

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  • Edward Bergman

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Abstract

European universities have lost--and partially regained--key research academics to North American and other attractive university systems. EU efforts to reverse the cycle revolve around the establishment of an attractive European Research Area, within which future academic mobility--and commercial knowledge transmission--might be confined. This paper draws upon a survey of 1800 academics in 200 of Europe's most research-intensive universities to understand the principal reasons that underlie contemporary academic mobility. Mobility is conceptualised in Hirschmann terms as 'exit' from an inadequately performing university, rather than remaining 'loyal' to its existing regime or staying to exercise 'voice' in bringing about necessary improvements. The results from logit modeling of choices and options indicate clearly that academics who evidence either 'loyalty' or 'voice' are significantly less likely to be mobile. Moreover, those who are mobile refuse to restrict possible destinations to the ERA if they value better material conditions or better quality of colleagues, students or university reputation.

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  • Edward Bergman, 2011. "Hirschmann Mobility Among Academics of Highly Ranked EU Research Universities," ERSA conference papers ersa11p1134, European Regional Science Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:wiw:wiwrsa:ersa11p1134
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    File URL: http://www-sre.wu.ac.at/ersa/ersaconfs/ersa11/e110830aFinal01134.pdf
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    1. Amelie F. Constant & Elena D’Agosto, 2010. "Where Do the Brainy Italians Go?," AIEL Series in Labour Economics,in: Floro Ernesto Caroleo & Francesco Pastore (ed.), The Labour Market Impact of the EU Enlargement. A New Regional Geography of Europe?, edition 1, chapter 10, pages 247-271 AIEL - Associazione Italiana Economisti del Lavoro.
    2. Edward M. Bergman, 2010. "Knowledge links between European universities and firms: A review," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 89(2), pages 311-333, June.
    3. Gustavo A. Crespi & Aldo Geuna & Lionel J. J. Nesta, 2006. "Labour Mobility of Academic Inventors. Career Decision and Knowledge Transfer," SPRU Working Paper Series 139, SPRU - Science and Technology Policy Research, University of Sussex.
    4. Michaela Trippl & Gunther Maier, 2012. "Star Scientists and Regional Knowledge Transfer," Chapters,in: Foundations of the Knowledge Economy, chapter 5 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    5. Andries de Grip & Didier Fouarge & Jan Sauermann, 2010. "What affects international migration of European science and engineering graduates?," Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(5), pages 407-421.
    6. Maier, Gunther & Kurka, Bernhard & Trippl, Michaela, 2007. "Knowledge Spillover Agents and Regional Development: Spatial Distribution and Mobility of Star Scientists," Papers DYNREG17, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
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    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. On the mobility of academics in Europe
      by Economic Logician in Economic Logic on 2011-12-22 21:54:00

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    1. repec:spr:scient:v:104:y:2015:i:3:d:10.1007_s11192-015-1625-3 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Thomas Bolli & Jörg Schläpfer, 2015. "Job mobility, peer effects, and research productivity in economics," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 104(3), pages 629-650, September.

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