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Cultural Diversity and Cultural Distance as Choice Determinants of Migration Destination

Author

Listed:
  • Zhiling Wang
  • Thomas de Graaff
  • Peter Nijkamp

    (VU University Amsterdam)

Abstract

This study analyses the impact of cultural composition on regional attractiveness from the perspective of migrant sorting behaviour. We use an attitudinal survey to quantify cultural distances between natives and immigrants in the area concerned, and estimate the migrants’ varying preferences for both cultural diversity and cultural distance. To account for regional unobserved heterogeneity, our econometric analysis employs artificial instrumental variables, as developed by Bayer et al. (2004). The main conclusions are twofold. On the one hand, cultural diversity increases regional attractiveness. On the other hand, average cultural distance greatly weakens regional attractiveness, even when the presence of network effect is controlled for.

Suggested Citation

  • Zhiling Wang & Thomas de Graaff & Peter Nijkamp, 2014. "Cultural Diversity and Cultural Distance as Choice Determinants of Migration Destination," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 14-066/VIII, Tinbergen Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:tin:wpaper:20140066
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Éric Rougier & Nicolas Yol, 2019. "The volatility effect of diaspora's location," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 42(6), pages 1796-1827, June.
    2. Didier Fouarge & Merve Nezihe Özer & Philipp Seegers, 2019. "Personality traits, migration intentions, and cultural distance," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 98(6), pages 2425-2454, December.
    3. Chiswick, Barry R. & Wang, Zhiling, 2019. "Social Contacts, Dutch Language Proficiency and Immigrant Economic Performance in the Netherlands," GLO Discussion Paper Series 419, Global Labor Organization (GLO).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    migration; cultural diversity; cultural distance; destination choice; sorting;

    JEL classification:

    • R2 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis
    • Z1 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics

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