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Cultural heritage and the location choice of Dutch households in a residential sorting model

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  • Mark van Duijn
  • Jan Rouwendal

Abstract

Local amenities are an important factor in the location choice of households. Heterogeneity in preferences of households tends to sort households over different locations which satisfy best their preferences given their constraints. In this paper, we analyze the effect of cultural heritage on the location choice of households using a residential sorting model. Cultural heritage is often a determining factor of the specific atmosphere of a location and is valued as such by its residents. Since the attractiveness of a residential location may be affected by amenities in the surrounding locations, spatial econometrics is used to deal with these interdependencies. Our model accounts for unobserved characteristics of locations, heterogeneity of households and spatial correlation between the observed (and unobserved) attractiveness of locations. The results show, for instance, that the willingness to pay of highly educated households to reside in municipalities close to a high concentration of cultural heritage is higher than other types of households.
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  • Mark van Duijn & Jan Rouwendal, 2013. "Cultural heritage and the location choice of Dutch households in a residential sorting model," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 13(3), pages 473-500, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:jecgeo:v:13:y:2013:i:3:p:473-500
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/jeg/lbs028
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    8. J. Barkley Rosser, 2009. "Introduction," Chapters,in: Handbook of Research on Complexity, chapter 1 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    9. Nicolai V. Kuminoff & V. Kerry Smith & Christopher Timmins, 2010. "The New Economics of Equilibrium Sorting and its Transformational Role for Policy Evaluation," NBER Working Papers 16349, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. David M. Drukker & Peter Egger & Ingmar R. Prucha, 2013. "On Two-Step Estimation of a Spatial Autoregressive Model with Autoregressive Disturbances and Endogenous Regressors," Econometric Reviews, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(5-6), pages 686-733, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ruben Loon & Tom Gosens & Jan Rouwendal, 2014. "Cultural heritage and the attractiveness of cities: evidence from recreation trips," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 38(3), pages 253-285, August.
    2. Mark van Duijn & Jan Rouwendal & Ruben van Loon, 2014. "Urban Resilience: Store Location Dynamics and Cultural Heritage," ERSA conference papers ersa14p1158, European Regional Science Association.
    3. Zhang, Zhaohua & Hite, Diane, 2015. "House Value, Crime and Residential Location Choice," 2015 Annual Meeting, January 31-February 3, 2015, Atlanta, Georgia 196826, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
    4. Zhiling Wang & Thomas De Graaff & Peter Nijkamp, 2016. "Cultural Diversity and Cultural Distance as Choice Determinants of Migration Destination," Spatial Economic Analysis, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(2), pages 176-200, June.
    5. Jacob Macdonald & Sofia Franco, 2015. "The Effects of Tangible Immovable Cultural Heritage on Residential Property Values: Evidence from Lisbon, Portugal," ERSA conference papers ersa15p657, European Regional Science Association.
    6. Martijn J. Burger & Evert J. Meijers & Marloes M. Hoogerbrugge & Jaume Masip Tresserra, 2015. "Borrowed Size, Agglomeration Shadows and Cultural Amenities in North-West Europe," European Planning Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(6), pages 1090-1109, June.
    7. Jan Rouwendal & Jasper Dekkers & Jaap Boter, 2013. "Modelling The Relationship Between Different Typs Of Urban Amenities And Knowledge Workers Using Spatial Panel Data," ERSA conference papers ersa13p1193, European Regional Science Association.
    8. Ismir Mulalic & Ninette Pilegaard & Jan Rouwendal, 2015. "Does improving Public Transport decrease Car Ownership? Evidence from the Copenhagen Metropolitan Area," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 15-139/VIII, Tinbergen Institute.
    9. Or Levkovich & Jan Rouwendal, 2014. "Location Choices of highly Educated Foreign Workers: the Importance of Urban Amenities," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 14-093/VIII, Tinbergen Institute.
    10. Mark van Duijn & Jan Rouwendal, 2015. "Sorting based on Urban Heritage and Income: Evidence from the Amsterdam Metropolitan Area," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 15-030/VIII, Tinbergen Institute, revised 19 Mar 2018.
    11. ., 2014. "Residential segregation and people sorting within cities," Chapters,in: Urban Economics and Urban Policy, chapter 3, pages 54-76 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    12. Zhiling Wang & Thomas de Graaff & Peter Nijkamp, 2014. "The choice of migration destinations: cultural diversity versus cultural distance," ERSA conference papers ersa14p1147, European Regional Science Association.
    13. Paul Verstraten & Gerard Verweij & Peter Zwaneveld, 2018. "Why do wages grow faster in urban areas? Sorting of high potentials matters," CPB Discussion Paper 377, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.

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