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Welfare Benefits of Agglomeration and Worker Heterogeneity

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  • De Groot, Henri L.F.
  • Ossokina, Ioulia V.
  • Teulings, Coen N

Abstract

The direct impact of local public goods on welfare is relatively easy to measure from land rents. However, the indirect effects on home and job location, on land use, and on agglomeration benefits are hard to pin down. We develop a spatial general equilibrium model for the valuation of these effects. The model is estimated using data on transport infrastructure, commuting behavior, wages, land use and land rents for 3000 ZIP-codes in the Netherlands and for three levels of education. Welfare benefits are shown to differ sharply by workers' educational attainment.

Suggested Citation

  • De Groot, Henri L.F. & Ossokina, Ioulia V. & Teulings, Coen N, 2014. "Welfare Benefits of Agglomeration and Worker Heterogeneity," CEPR Discussion Papers 10216, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:10216
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    Cited by:

    1. Sander Hoogendoorn & Joost van Gemeren & Paul Verstraten & Kees Folmer, 2016. "House prices and accessibility: Evidence from a natural experiment in transport infrastructure," CPB Discussion Paper 322, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
    2. Coen N. Teulings, 2016. "Secular Stagnation, Rational Bubbles, and Fiscal Policy," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1642, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    3. Bruno De Borger & Stef Proost, 2015. " Tax and regulatory policies for European Transport – getting there, but in the slow lane," Working Papers Department of Economics 497597, KU Leuven, Faculty of Economics and Business, Department of Economics.
    4. Rachel, Lukasz & Smith, Thomas D, 2016. "Secular drivers of the global real interest rate," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 86242, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    5. Teulings, Coen, 2016. "Secular stagnation, rational bubbles, and fiscal policy," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 86220, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    6. Victor Couture & Jessie Handbury, 2017. "Urban Revival in America, 2000 to 2010," NBER Working Papers 24084, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    agglomeration; land rates; local public goods; residential sorting; spatial equilibrium;

    JEL classification:

    • H4 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods
    • H54 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Infrastructures
    • R13 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - General Equilibrium and Welfare Economic Analysis of Regional Economies
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population
    • R4 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics

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