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No Place Like Home? Graduate Migration in Germany

Author

Listed:
  • Tina Haussen
  • Silke Uebelmesser

Abstract

We empirically analyze sub-national migration of graduates in Germany and its determinants. Based on a longitudinal, representative survey-based dataset of students who graduated in the academic year 2004/2005, we observe the transition to the labor market and previous and subsequent migration patterns. We find that, five years after graduation, about 60% of the graduates are employed in the university state either because they have stayed or returned. Whether or not graduates migrate largely depends on previous migration, job search characteristics and the states’ economic conditions. This results in an unbalanced migration of graduates between German states. From a public policy perspective, our analysis provides some rational for correction mechanisms. This paper presents research output of the Ifo Center of Excellence for Migration and Integration Research (CEMIR)

Suggested Citation

  • Tina Haussen & Silke Uebelmesser, 2015. "No Place Like Home? Graduate Migration in Germany," CESifo Working Paper Series 5524, CESifo Group Munich.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_5524
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    File URL: https://www.cesifo-group.de/DocDL/cesifo1_wp5524.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Panu Poutvaara, 2003. "Educating Europe," Public Economics 0302008, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Michael Fritsch & Ronney Aamoucke, 2013. "Regional public research, higher education, and innovative start-ups: an empirical investigation," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 41(4), pages 865-885, December.
    3. Oliver Busch & Benjamin Weigert, 2010. "Where have all the graduates gone? Internal cross-state migration of graduates in Germany 1984–2004," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 44(3), pages 559-572, June.
    4. Stefan Krabel & Choni Flöther, 2014. "Here Today, Gone Tomorrow? Regional Labour Mobility of German University Graduates," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(10), pages 1609-1627, October.
    5. Tim Krieger & Thomas Lange, 2010. "Education policy and tax competition with imperfect student and labor mobility," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 17(6), pages 587-606, December.
    6. Matthias Parey & Fabian Waldinger, 2011. "Studying Abroad and the Effect on International Labour Market Mobility: Evidence from the Introduction of ERASMUS," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 121(551), pages 194-222, March.
    7. Panu Poutvaara, 2004. "Educating Europe: Should Public Education be Financed with Graduate Taxes or Income-contingent Loans?," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 50(4), pages 663-684.
    8. Elena Del Rey, 2001. "Economic Integration and Public Provision of Education," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 28(2), pages 203-218, June.
    9. Moshe Justman & Jacques-Francois Thisse, 2000. "Local Public Funding of Higher Education When Skilled Labor is Imperfectly Mobile," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 7(3), pages 247-258, May.
    10. Maureen Were & Steve Kayizzi-Mugerwa, 2009. "Do Exporting Firms Pay Higher Wages? Evidence from Kenya’s Manufacturing Sector," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 21(3), pages 435-453.
    11. Viktor Venhorst & Jouke Van Dijk & Leo Van Wissen, 2011. "An Analysis of Trends in Spatial Mobility of Dutch Graduates," Spatial Economic Analysis, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(1), pages 57-82.
    12. Angelika Jaeger & Johannes Kopper, 2014. "Third mission potential in higher education: measuring the regional focus of different types of HEIs," Review of Regional Research: Jahrbuch für Regionalwissenschaft, Springer;Gesellschaft für Regionalforschung (GfR), vol. 34(2), pages 95-118, October.
    13. Alessandra Faggian & Philip McCann, 2009. "Human capital, graduate migration and innovation in British regions," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 33(2), pages 317-333, March.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Astrid Würtz Rasmussen & Leslie S. Stratton, 2016. "How distance to a non-resident parent relates to child outcomes," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 14(4), pages 829-857, December.
    2. Didier Fouarge & Merve Nezihe Özer & Philipp Seegers, 2019. "Personality traits, migration intentions, and cultural distance," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 98(6), pages 2425-2454, December.
    3. repec:iab:iabdpa:201803 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    graduate migration; higher education funding; longitudinal graduate survey; job changes;

    JEL classification:

    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy
    • H72 - Public Economics - - State and Local Government; Intergovernmental Relations - - - State and Local Budget and Expenditures
    • H75 - Public Economics - - State and Local Government; Intergovernmental Relations - - - State and Local Government: Health, Education, and Welfare
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

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