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Here Today, Gone Tomorrow? Regional Labor Mobility of German University Graduates


  • Stefan Krabel

    (Internationales Zentrum für Hochschulforschung (INCHER))

  • Choni Flöther

    (Institut für Volkswirtschaftslehre: Fachgebiet Allg. Wirtschaftspolitik)


In this study we trace university graduates’ labor mobility when entering the labor market after graduation. We examine to what extent such mobility is determined by regional factors of the university region, personal characteristics of graduates as well as their field of study. Our analysis is based on a large-scale dataset of labor market mobility of individuals who graduated from 36 German universities in 2007. Our results suggest that graduates are less likely to leave metropolises and that regional labor markets influence mobility. Further, field of study and individual willingness to be mobile, as indicated by prior mobility from school to university and mobility during the studies, impact mobility when entering the labor market. These results indicate that both regional and individual factors influence graduate mobility. Moreover, by applying a two-stage model approach we find that mobility is mediated by the probability to find regular employment.

Suggested Citation

  • Stefan Krabel & Choni Flöther, 2011. "Here Today, Gone Tomorrow? Regional Labor Mobility of German University Graduates," MAGKS Papers on Economics 201110, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Faculty of Business Administration and Economics, Department of Economics (Volkswirtschaftliche Abteilung).
  • Handle: RePEc:mar:magkse:201110

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Sidonia von Proff, 2015. "How individual characteristics and attitudes shape the job search process of graduates," Working Papers on Innovation and Space 2015-02, Philipps University Marburg, Department of Geography.
    2. Clément Gorin, 2016. "Patterns and determinants of inventors’ mobility across European urban areas," Working Papers 1615, Groupe d'Analyse et de Théorie Economique Lyon St-Étienne (GATE Lyon St-Étienne), Université de Lyon.
    3. Maier, Michael F. & Sprietsma, Maresa, 2016. "Does it pay to move? Returns to regional mobility at the start of the career for tertiary education graduates," ZEW Discussion Papers 16-060, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    4. repec:iab:iabdpa:201803 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Tina Haussen & Silke Übelmesser, 2015. "No Place Like Home? Graduate Migration in Germany," CESifo Working Paper Series 5524, CESifo Group Munich.
    6. Ugo Fratesi, 2014. "Editorial: The Mobility of High-Skilled Workers - Causes and Consequences," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(10), pages 1587-1591, October.
    7. Fichtl, Anita & Piopiunik, Marc, 2017. "Absolventen von Fachhochschulen und Universitäten im Vergleich: FuE-Tätigkeiten, Arbeitsmarktergebnisse, Kompetenzen und Mobilität," Studien zum deutschen Innovationssystem 14-2017, Expertenkommission Forschung und Innovation (EFI) - Commission of Experts for Research and Innovation, Berlin.
    8. Guido Buenstorf & Matthias Geissler & Stefan Krabel, 2016. "Locations of labor market entry by German university graduates: is (regional) beauty in the eye of the beholder?
      [Standortentscheidungen deutscher Hochschulabsolventen beim Berufseinstieg – Liegt (
      ," Review of Regional Research: Jahrbuch für Regionalwissenschaft, Springer;Gesellschaft für Regionalforschung (GfR), vol. 36(1), pages 29-49, February.
    9. Clément Gorin, 2016. "Patterns and determinants of inventors' mobility across European urban areas," Working Papers halshs-01313086, HAL.
    10. Sidonia von Proff & Matthias Duschl & Thomas Brenner, 2014. "Motives behind the mobility of university graduates – A study of three German universities," Working Papers on Innovation and Space 2014-08, Philipps University Marburg, Department of Geography.

    More about this item


    Regional Mobility; Regional Characteristics; University; Graduates; Employment; Labor Markets;

    JEL classification:

    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search
    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education

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