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Job Changes and Interregional Migration of Graduates

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  • Haußen, Tina
  • Haussen, Tina

Abstract

We empirically analyze job changes and related location choices for graduates in Germany and its determinants. Using a longitudinal, representative survey-based dataset, we not only observe the transition of graduates to the labor market but also every subsequent job change within five years after graduation. Contrary to what is often assumed in the literature, our findings show that around 75% of the graduates have more than one job within our observation period and for a non-negligible share of them, job changes are related to interregional migration. Whereas job changes mostly depend on the field of study and previous employment conditions, migration is predominantly affected by previous migration paths and regional characteristics.

Suggested Citation

  • Haußen, Tina & Haussen, Tina, 2016. "Job Changes and Interregional Migration of Graduates," Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145618, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:vfsc16:145618
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    JEL classification:

    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes
    • I23 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Higher Education; Research Institutions

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