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Comparative Patterns of Migration Intentions: Evidence from Eastern European Students in Economics from Romania and Republic of Moldova

Author

Listed:
  • Aurelian-Petruș Plopeanu

    () (Department of Social Sciences and Humanities, Institute of Interdisciplinary Research, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iași, Alexandru Lăpușneanu Street, No.14, 700057 Iași, Romania)

  • Daniel Homocianu

    () (Department of Accounting, Business Information Systems and Statistics, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iași, Carol I, Blvd., No. 22, Building B, room B330A, 700505 Iași, Romania)

  • Nelu Florea

    () (Department of Management, Marketing and Business Administration, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iași, 700505 Iași, Romania)

  • Ovidiu-Aurel Ghiuță

    () (Department of Food Technology, Food Production and Environmental Safety, Ștefan cel Mare University of Suceava, 720204 Suceava, Romania)

  • Dinu Airinei

    () (Department of Accounting, Business Information Systems and Statistics, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iași, Carol I, Blvd., No. 22, Building B, Room B308, 700505 Iași, Romania)

Abstract

Based on a survey among students in economics at universities from the Romanian region of Moldova (RoMold) and Republic of Moldova (ReMold), this study explores the influence of familial, background, and individual characteristics on the migration intentions abroad. Both regional models built after using data mining tools and binary logistic regression analysis show a powerful emphasis on our own value recognition, while the other influences indicate clear asymmetric patterns in terms of migration intentions. For RoMold, there is a low level of interpersonal trust, a strong accent on individual liberty and favoritism, a low respect for traditions, and the belief that Orthodoxy could be a migration cause. The paternal occupation and the maternal religiosity matter for their migration plans. For ReMold, the parental migration experience, a low level of parents’ education attainment, and a powerful internal locus of control are considered the main triggers for migrating abroad. For both particular regions, a highly interactive distribution map and two corresponding risk-prediction nomograms provide basic support for replication, fast visual insight, and consistent support for interpretations directly in probabilistic terms. We intend to apply an inductive approach in order to extend the analysis to different types of respondents and geographic areas.

Suggested Citation

  • Aurelian-Petruș Plopeanu & Daniel Homocianu & Nelu Florea & Ovidiu-Aurel Ghiuță & Dinu Airinei, 2019. "Comparative Patterns of Migration Intentions: Evidence from Eastern European Students in Economics from Romania and Republic of Moldova," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(18), pages 1-21, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:11:y:2019:i:18:p:4935-:d:265792
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    migration intentions; own value recognition; familial and individual features; interactive distribution map; data mining; binary logistic regression; risk-prediction nomograms;

    JEL classification:

    • Q - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics
    • Q0 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General
    • Q2 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q3 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q5 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products

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