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An Experimental Test of the Under-Annuitization Puzzle with Smooth Ambiguity and Charitable Giving

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  • Attanasi, Giuseppe Marco
  • D'Albis, Hippolyte
  • Thibault, Emmanuel

Abstract

In a life-cycle model with a bequest motive, we study the impact of smooth ambiguity aversion to uncertain survival probabilities on the optimal demand for annuities. We implement a theory-driven laboratory experiment. First, a subject's ambiguity attitude is elicited in a simple experimental setting able to make the smooth ambiguity model operational. Then, in a two-period annuity-bequest decision problem, the subject's bequest in the second period is presented as a donation to a previously chosen charity, contingent to the subject being active after the first period. In line with the theoretical predictions, we find that ambiguity-averse (resp., loving) subjects invest less (resp., more) in annuities than ambiguity-neutral ones. Furthermore, subjects'contingent donation to the chosen charity increases in their investment in annuities only for sufficiently high levels of warm-glow altruism.

Suggested Citation

  • Attanasi, Giuseppe Marco & D'Albis, Hippolyte & Thibault, Emmanuel, 2018. "An Experimental Test of the Under-Annuitization Puzzle with Smooth Ambiguity and Charitable Giving," TSE Working Papers 18-932, Toulouse School of Economics (TSE).
  • Handle: RePEc:tse:wpaper:32756
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Giuseppe Attanasi & Kene Boun My & Nikolaos Georgantzís & Miguel Ginés, 2019. "Strategic Ethics: Altruism without the Other-regarding Confound," GREDEG Working Papers 2019-13, Groupe de REcherche en Droit, Economie, Gestion (GREDEG CNRS), University of Nice Sophia Antipolis.
    2. Giuseppe Attanasi & Ylenia Curci & Patrick Llerena & Giulia Urso, 2019. "Intrinsic vs. extrinsic motivators on creative collaboration: The effect of sharing rewards," Working Papers of BETA 2019-37, Bureau d'Economie Théorique et Appliquée, UDS, Strasbourg.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Self-insurance; annuity; uncertain survival probabilities; smooth ambiguity aversion; charity; experiment;

    JEL classification:

    • C91 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Individual Behavior
    • D81 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Criteria for Decision-Making under Risk and Uncertainty
    • G22 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Insurance; Insurance Companies; Actuarial Studies

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