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Globalization, robotization and electoral outcomes: Evidence from spatial regressions for Italy

Author

Listed:
  • Mauro Caselli

    ()

  • Andrea Fracasso

    ()

  • Silvio Traverso

Abstract

Criticism of economic globalization and technological progress has gained support in Italy in the last two decades but, due to the di↵erentiated exposure of local communities to this process, political outcomes have varied considerably across the country. By observing the local impact of three global economic phenomena (flows of migrants, foreign competition in international trade, and di↵usion of robots) alongside with the patterns of local electoral outcomes potentially associated with discontent, this work analyses from a spatial perspective the economic forces driving the evolution of general elections in 2001, 2008 and 2013 in Italy. The analysis reveals that all these global factors had an impact on political outcomes associated with discontent, albeit in different ways and changing over time. These novel em- pirical results indicate that these global drivers interacted with elements pertaining to the political supply, such as party federation and scandals. By combining various methodological advances coming from the political geography and the political economy literature, this work attempts to bridge disciplines sharing similar interests but adopting di↵erent tools of analysis.

Suggested Citation

  • Mauro Caselli & Andrea Fracasso & Silvio Traverso, 2019. "Globalization, robotization and electoral outcomes: Evidence from spatial regressions for Italy," DEM Working Papers 2019/5, Department of Economics and Management.
  • Handle: RePEc:trn:utwprg:2019/05
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Barone, Guglielmo & Kreuter, Helena, 2019. "Low-wage import competition and populist backlash: The case of Italy," FiFo Discussion Papers - Finanzwissenschaftliche Diskussionsbeiträge 19-05, University of Cologne, FiFo Institute for Public Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Indirect inference; directional statistics; stable distribution; weighting matrix;

    JEL classification:

    • D72 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Political Processes: Rent-seeking, Lobbying, Elections, Legislatures, and Voting Behavior
    • F14 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Empirical Studies of Trade
    • F60 - International Economics - - Economic Impacts of Globalization - - - General
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes

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