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Uncertainty, Misallocation and the Life-cycle Growth of Firms

Author

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  • Eero Mäkynen

    (University of Turku, Finland.)

  • Oskari Vähämaa

    (University of Helsinki, Finland.)

Abstract

We develop a measure of static misallocation that separates uncertainty from misallocation generated by tax-like distortions. In the Finnish firm-level data, uncertainty accounts for the majority of ex post misallocation and explains a strong decreasing age-dependent trend in it. To understand these observations, we set up a life-cycle model of firm growth where new firms have to learn their productivity. We match our model with the salient features of the data and show that our model implies idiosyncratic distortions, in line with our accounting approach. According to our quantitative results, uncertainty suppresses output by 38%, while misallocation has a 26% negative effect on output.

Suggested Citation

  • Eero Mäkynen & Oskari Vähämaa, 2021. "Uncertainty, Misallocation and the Life-cycle Growth of Firms," Discussion Papers 146, Aboa Centre for Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:tkk:dpaper:dp146
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    firm dynamics; uncertainty; misallocation;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D24 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Production; Cost; Capital; Capital, Total Factor, and Multifactor Productivity; Capacity
    • E23 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Production
    • L11 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Production, Pricing, and Market Structure; Size Distribution of Firms
    • O47 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Empirical Studies of Economic Growth; Aggregate Productivity; Cross-Country Output Convergence

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