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ICT, Skills and Organisational Change: Evidence from a Panel of Italian Manufacturing Firms

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  • Paola Giuri
  • Salvatore Torrisi
  • Natalia Zinovyeva

Abstract

This paper explores the complementarity between skills, organizational change and investments in information and communication technology (ICT). Our work contributes to the literature on the effects of ICT by testing the hypothesis of complementarity in a panel of 540 Italian manufacturing firms during the period 1995-2000. Our analysis provides strong support to the hypothesis of complementarity between skills and ICT (which is at the core of the skill-biased technical change theory). We also find some evidence in favour of the skill-biased organizational change hypothesis. The results obtained by drawing on different statistical methods suggest that interactions among ICT, skills and organizational change are complex and non-linear and difficult to explain.

Suggested Citation

  • Paola Giuri & Salvatore Torrisi & Natalia Zinovyeva, 2005. "ICT, Skills and Organisational Change: Evidence from a Panel of Italian Manufacturing Firms," LEM Papers Series 2005/11, Laboratory of Economics and Management (LEM), Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy.
  • Handle: RePEc:ssa:lemwps:2005/11
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Inge Sieben & Andries De Grip & Jessica Longen & Ole Sørensen, 2009. "Technology, Selection, and Training in Call Centers," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 62(4), pages 553-572, July.
    2. Tommaso Ciarli & Roberta Rabellotti, 2007. "ICT in Industrial Districts: An Empirical Analysis on Adoption, Use and Impact," Industry and Innovation, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(3), pages 277-303.
    3. Samoilenko, Sergey & Osei-Bryson, Kweku-Muata, 2008. "An exploration of the effects of the interaction between ICT and labor force on economic growth in transition economies," International Journal of Production Economics, Elsevier, vol. 115(2), pages 471-481, October.
    4. Tatiana Muntean, 2014. "Intangible Assets and their Contribution to Labour Productivity Growth in Ontario," International Productivity Monitor, Centre for the Study of Living Standards, vol. 27, pages 22-39, Fall.
    5. Bocquet, Rachel & Brossard, Olivier & Sabatier, Mareva, 2007. "Complementarities in organizational design and the diffusion of information technologies: An empirical analysis," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(3), pages 367-386, April.

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    Keywords

    Organisational Change; ICT Investment; Workplace Organization; Human Capital; Productivity;
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