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Information Technology and Productivity Growth Across Countries and Sectors

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  • Francesco Daveri

Abstract

The extraordinary success of the U.S. economy and the parallel growth slowdown of the large European countries and Japan in the 1990s bear a simple rationale. The United States has eventually benefited from the effective adoption of information technologies. The introduction of the newly installed IT capital has not instead enhanced aggregate capital accumulation and TFP growth in Europe and Japan. At least on impact, IT capital has mainly displaced existing capital and methods of production rather than supplementing them. The limited growth-enhancing effects from information technologies in countries other than the United States have occurred in the IT-producing sectors, while the IT-using industries have contributed the bulk of productivity gains in the United States.

Suggested Citation

  • Francesco Daveri, 2003. "Information Technology and Productivity Growth Across Countries and Sectors," Working Papers 227, IGIER (Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research), Bocconi University.
  • Handle: RePEc:igi:igierp:227
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    Cited by:

    1. Engelbrecht, Hans-Jurgen & Xayavong, Vilaphonh, 2006. "ICT intensity and New Zealand's productivity malaise: Is the glass half empty or half full?," Information Economics and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 24-42, March.
    2. Aboal D. & Tacsir E., 2015. "Innovation and productivity in services and manufacturing : The role of ICT investment," MERIT Working Papers 012, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    3. Maciej Bukowski & Grzegorz Koloch & Piotr Lewandowski & Anna Baranowska & Iga Magda & Arkadiusz Szydlowski & Jacek Bielinski & Magdalena Bober & Malgorzata Sarzalska & Julian Zawistowski, 2008. "Employment in Poland 2007. Security on a Flexible Labour Market," Books and Reports published by IBS, Instytut Badan Strukturalnych, number zwp2007 edited by Maciej Bukowski, january.
    4. Paola Giuri & Salvatore Torrisi & Natalia Zinovyeva, 2005. "ICT, Skills and Organisational Change: Evidence from a Panel of Italian Manufacturing Firms," LEM Papers Series 2005/11, Laboratory of Economics and Management (LEM), Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy.
    5. Nirvikar Singh, 2008. "Transaction costs, information technology and development," Indian Growth and Development Review, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 1(2), pages 212-236, September.
    6. Andrés Maroto & Luis Rubalcaba, 2008. "Services productivity revisited," The Service Industries Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 28(3), pages 337-353, April.
    7. Francesco Quatraro, 2011. "ICT capital and services complementarities: the Italian evidence," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(20), pages 2603-2613.
    8. Engelbrecht, Hans-Jurgen & Xayavong, Vilaphonh, 2004. "Information And Communication Technology And New Zealand'S Productivity Malaise: An Industry-Level Study," Discussion Papers 23698, Massey University, Department of Applied and International Economics.
    9. Simona Iammarino & Cecilia Jona-Lasinio & Susanna Mantegazza, 2005. "Productivity, Ict and Regional Disparities in Italy," QA - Rivista dell'Associazione Rossi-Doria, Associazione Rossi Doria, issue 3, July.
    10. Hans-Günther Vieweg & Thomas Fuchs & Reinhard Hild & Andreas Kuhlmann & Stefan Lachenmaier & Michael Reinhard & Uwe Christian Täger & Sebastian de Ramon & Jan-Egbert Sturm, 2005. "Stand und Perspektiven der "New Economy" in ausgewählten Mitgliedstaaten der EU aus deutscher Sicht," ifo Beiträge zur Wirtschaftsforschung, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, number 19.

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