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ICT intensity and New Zealand's productivity malaise: Is the glass half empty or half full?

  • Engelbrecht, Hans-Jurgen
  • Xayavong, Vilaphonh
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Information Economics and Policy.

    Volume (Year): 18 (2006)
    Issue (Month): 1 (March)
    Pages: 24-42

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:iepoli:v:18:y:2006:i:1:p:24-42
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    1. Dean Parham & Paul Roberts & Haishun Sun, 2001. "Information Technology and Australia’s Productivity Surge," Development and Comp Systems 0110006, EconWPA.
    2. Nadim Ahmad & François Lequiller & Pascal Marianna & Dirk Pilat & Paul Schreyer & Anita Wölfl, 2003. "Comparing Labour Productivity Growth in the OECD Area: The Role of Measurement," OECD Statistics Working Papers 2003/5, OECD Publishing.
    3. Paul Schreyer, 2000. "The Contribution of Information and Communication Technology to Output Growth: A Study of the G7 Countries," OECD Science, Technology and Industry Working Papers 2000/2, OECD Publishing.
    4. David Galt, 2000. "New Zealand’s Economic Growth," Treasury Working Paper Series 00/09, New Zealand Treasury.
    5. Stefano Scarpetta & Andrea Bassanini & Dirk Pilat & Paul Schreyer, 2000. "Economic Growth in the OECD Area: Recent Trends at the Aggregate and Sectoral Level," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 248, OECD Publishing.
    6. Kevin J. Stiroh, 2001. "Information technology and the U.S. productivity revival: what do the industry data say?," Staff Reports 115, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    7. van Ark, Bart, 2002. "Measuring the New Economy: An International Comparative Perspective," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 48(1), pages 1-14, March.
    8. Oecd, 2003. "Seizing the Benefits of ICT in a Digital Economy," OECD Digital Economy Papers 72, OECD Publishing.
    9. Erwin Diewert & Denis Lawrence, 1999. "Measuring New Zealand’s Productivity," Treasury Working Paper Series 99/05, New Zealand Treasury.
    10. David, Paul A, 1990. "The Dynamo and the Computer: An Historical Perspective on the Modern Productivity Paradox," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 80(2), pages 355-61, May.
    11. John Simon & Sharon Wardrop, 2002. "Australian Use of Information Technology and its Contribution to Growth," RBA Research Discussion Papers rdp2002-02, Reserve Bank of Australia.
    12. Stiroh, Kevin J, 2002. "Are ICT Spillovers Driving the New Economy?," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 48(1), pages 33-57, March.
    13. Engelbrecht, Hans-Jurgen & Xayavong, Vilaphonh, 2004. "Information And Communication Technology And New Zealand'S Productivity Malaise: An Industry-Level Study," Discussion Papers 23698, Massey University, Department of Applied and International Economics.
    14. MartinNeil Baily & Robert Z. Lawrence, 2001. "Do We Have a New E-conomy?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(2), pages 308-312, May.
    15. Melleny Black & Melody Guy & Nathan McLellan, 2003. "Productivity in New Zealand 1988 to 2002," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(1), pages 119-150.
    16. W A Razzak, 2004. "Towards Building A New Consensus About New Zealand’s Productivity," GE, Growth, Math methods 0405002, EconWPA.
    17. Susanto Basu & John G. Fernald & Nicholas Oulton & Sylaja Srinivasan, 2003. "The case of the missing productivity growth: or, does information technology explain why productivity accelerated in the United States but not the United Kingdom?," Working Paper Series WP-03-08, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
    18. Francesco Daveri, 2003. "Information Technology and Productivity Growth Across Countries and Sectors," Working Papers 227, IGIER (Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research), Bocconi University.
    19. Dirk Pilat & Franck Lee & Bart van Ark, 2002. "Production and Use of ICT: A Sectoral Perspective on Productivity Growth in the OECD Area," OECD Economic Studies, OECD Publishing, vol. 2002(2), pages 47-78.
    20. Erik Brynjolfsson & Lorin M. Hitt, 2000. "Beyond Computation: Information Technology, Organizational Transformation and Business Performance," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 14(4), pages 23-48, Fall.
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