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Rethinking the corporate digital divide: The complementarity of technologies and the demand for digital skills

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  • Shakina, Elena
  • Parshakov, Petr
  • Alsufiev, Artem

Abstract

In this paper, we rethink the corporate digital divide, a phenomenon not studied in detail in prior research. Motivated by innovation-diffusion, competence-based and skill-biased technical change theories, we hypothesize that all digital technologies’ innovations must be supported by demand for related skills and should be integrated into an innovation cycle. This research is conducted using a vast dataset of 1000 large Russian firms observed over ten years, with information collected from open internet-based sources and processed through content analysis. Among the key findings, the digital-innovation cycle has been explored and visualized, by identifying the most probable period of these innovations and their further diffusion. The digital-divide concept has been explicated by examining data on the relative dynamics of digital skills demanded by the same companies during the period of investigation. The empirical results deliver an interesting insight and encourage us to rethink the corporate digital divide through causality between competency accumulation and digital technological shifts. That, in turn, identifies the conditions necessary for the prediction of demand shocks in relation to digital competencies in labor markets.

Suggested Citation

  • Shakina, Elena & Parshakov, Petr & Alsufiev, Artem, 2021. "Rethinking the corporate digital divide: The complementarity of technologies and the demand for digital skills," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 162(C).
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:tefoso:v:162:y:2021:i:c:s0040162520312312
    DOI: 10.1016/j.techfore.2020.120405
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    Cited by:

    1. Fernandez-Vidal, Jorge & Antonio Perotti, Francesco & Gonzalez, Reyes & Gasco, Jose, 2022. "Managing digital transformation: The view from the top," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 152(C), pages 29-41.
    2. Zeng, Huixiang & Ran, Hangxin & Zhou, Qiong & Jin, Youliang & Cheng, Xu, 2022. "The financial effect of firm digitalization: Evidence from China," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 183(C).
    3. Rodríguez-Espíndola, Oscar & Chowdhury, Soumyadeb & Dey, Prasanta Kumar & Albores, Pavel & Emrouznejad, Ali, 2022. "Analysis of the adoption of emergent technologies for risk management in the era of digital manufacturing," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 178(C).
    4. Chiarello, Filippo & Fantoni, Gualtiero & Hogarth, Terence & Giordano, Vito & Baltina, Liga & Spada, Irene, 2021. "Towards ESCO 4.0 – Is the European classification of skills in line with Industry 4.0? A text mining approach," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 173(C).
    5. Ritala, Paavo & Baiyere, Abayomi & Hughes, Mathew & Kraus, Sascha, 2021. "Digital strategy implementation: The role of individual entrepreneurial orientation and relational capital," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 171(C).
    6. Wang, Di & Zhou, Tao & Wang, Mengmeng, 2021. "Information and communication technology (ICT), digital divide and urbanization: Evidence from Chinese cities," Technology in Society, Elsevier, vol. 64(C).
    7. Lythreatis, Sophie & Singh, Sanjay Kumar & El-Kassar, Abdul-Nasser, 2022. "The digital divide: A review and future research agenda," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 175(C).
    8. Fernandez-Vidal, Jorge & Gonzalez, Reyes & Gasco, Jose & Llopis, Juan, 2022. "Digitalization and corporate transformation: The case of European oil & gas firms," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 174(C).
    9. Blanka, Christine & Krumay, Barbara & Rueckel, David, 2022. "The interplay of digital transformation and employee competency: A design science approach," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 178(C).

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