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Carbon Dioxide Emission Scenarios For The Usa

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  • Richard S.J. Tol

    () (Economic and Social Research Institute, Dublin)

Abstract

A model of carbon dioxide emissions of the USA is presented. The model consists of population, income per capita, economic structure, final and primary energy intensity per sector, primary fuel mix, and emission coefficients. The model is simple enough to be calibrated to observations since 1850. The model is used to project emissions until 2100. Best guess carbon dioxide emissions are in the middle of the IPCC SRES scenarios, but incomes and energy intensities are on the high side, while carbon intensities are on the low side. The confidence interval suggests that the SRES scenarios do not span the range of not-implausible futures. Although the model can be calibrated to reflect structural changes in the economy, it cannot anticipate such changes. The data poorly constrain crucial scenario elements, particularly energy prices. This suggests that the range of future emissions is wider still.

Suggested Citation

  • Richard S.J. Tol, 2006. "Carbon Dioxide Emission Scenarios For The Usa," Working Papers FNU-101, Research unit Sustainability and Global Change, Hamburg University, revised May 2006.
  • Handle: RePEc:sgc:wpaper:101
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Romeo, Luis M. & Calvo, Elena & Valero, Antonio & De Vita, Alessia, 2009. "Electricity consumption and CO2 capture potential in Spain," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 34(9), pages 1341-1350.
    2. Yuhong Wang & Xin Yao & Pengfei Yuan, 2015. "Strategic Adjustment of China’s Power Generation Capacity Structure Under the Constraint of Carbon Emission," Computational Economics, Springer;Society for Computational Economics, vol. 46(3), pages 421-435, October.
    3. Andersson, Fredrik N.G. & Karpestam, Peter, 2013. "CO2 emissions and economic activity: Short- and long-run economic determinants of scale, energy intensity and carbon intensity," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 1285-1294.
    4. Tian, Lixin & Jin, Rulei, 2012. "Theoretical exploration of carbon emissions dynamic evolutionary system and evolutionary scenario analysis," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 376-386.
    5. Meredith Fowlie, 2008. "Incomplete Environmental Regulation, Imperfect Competition, and Emissions Leakage," NBER Working Papers 14421, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Climate change; emissions scenarios; USA;

    JEL classification:

    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming

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