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Levels Of Education And Economic Performances Of Togo
[Niveaux D’Education Et Performances Economiques Du Togo]

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  • Palakiyèm Kpemoua

    (Université de Lomé [Togo])

Abstract

The main purpose of this paper is to determine the contribution of each level of education on growth in economic sectors of Togo, and to test the causality between each level of education and the growth in economic sectors, using Solow augmented model with human capital resources, developed by Mankiw and al. (1992). The data cover the period 1984-2014. The methodological approach is based on the cointegration, the causality tests and the fully modified ordinary least square (FMOLS) suggested by Philips and Hansen (1990). Estimates show that, the different levels of education generally, have a positive and significant impact on Togo's economic sectors which (impact) becomes lower as the level of education increases, and show also that the efforts undertaken by the country in terms of extension and accessibility have not been neutral in terms of economic performances. The results of the causality tests indicate a circular causality between economic growth and the primary schooling enrollment, a causality from the gross real added values of agriculture to the primary schooling enrollment and, from industry to the tertiary schooling enrollment on the one hand, from primary schooling enrollment to the gross added values of industry and services on the other hand, according to Toda and Yamamoto(1995).

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  • Palakiyèm Kpemoua, 2016. "Levels Of Education And Economic Performances Of Togo [Niveaux D’Education Et Performances Economiques Du Togo]," Working Papers halshs-01506650, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:wpaper:halshs-01506650
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-01506650
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    éducation et croissance; capital humain;

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