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Financial Development and International Trade

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  • Fernando Leibovici

    (New York University and York University)

Abstract

This paper studies the extent to which frictions in financial markets affect aggregate trade flows. I study a model of firm dynamics with financial frictions and international trade, calibrated to match key features of firm-level data. I find that, while financial frictions have a large effect on the pattern and extent of international trade at the industry-level, as documented in the literature, they have a small effect on trade at the aggregate-level. Relaxing the financial constraints allows more firms to finance the upfront export entry costs, with a significant impact on industry-level trade flows to the extent that the industry is small enough to affect equilibrium prices. In contrast, removing the financial constraints at the aggregate-level leads to an increase in the wage and interest rate, thereby reducing the returns to becoming an exporter, with a small impact on aggregate trade flows. I also find that the cross-industry response of international trade to financial development is quantitatively consistent with industry-level evidence on the extent of trade across countries, and that the effectiveness of policies aimed at increasing trade by easing the access to credit for exporters is limited if implemented at an economy-wide scale.

Suggested Citation

  • Fernando Leibovici, 2013. "Financial Development and International Trade," 2013 Meeting Papers 532, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed013:532
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Till Gross & Stephane Verani, 2012. "Financing Constraints, Firm Dynamics, and International Trade," 2012 Meeting Papers 1035, Society for Economic Dynamics.
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    Cited by:

    1. Kohn, David & Leibovici, Fernando & Szkup, Michal, 2020. "Financial frictions and export dynamics in large devaluations," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 122(C).
    2. Kohn, David & Leibovici, Fernando & Szkup, Michal, 2020. "Financial frictions and export dynamics in large devaluations," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 122(C).
    3. Niepmann, Friederike & Schmidt-Eisenlohr, Tim, 2017. "No guarantees, no trade: How banks affect export patterns," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 108(C), pages 338-350.
    4. Andreasen, Eugenia & Bauducco, Sofía & Dardati, Evangelina, 2017. "Capital Controls and Firm Performance: The Effects of the Chilean Encaje," Research Department working papers 1153, CAF Development Bank Of Latinamerica.
    5. Daniel Paravisini & Veronica Rappoport & Philipp Schnabl & Daniel Wolfenzon, 2015. "Dissecting the Effect of Credit Supply on Trade: Evidence from Matched Credit-Export Data," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 82(1), pages 333-359.
    6. David Kohn & Fernando Leibovici & Michal Szkup, 2016. "Financial Frictions And New Exporter Dynamics," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 57, pages 453-486, May.
    7. Kohn, David & Leibovici, Fernando & Szkup, Michal, 2017. "Financial Frictions, Trade, and Misallocation," Research Department working papers 1106, CAF Development Bank Of Latinamerica.
    8. N.R. Ramírez-Rondán & Marco E. Terrones & Andrea Vilchez, 2018. "Does financial sector development affect the growth gains from trade openness?," Working Papers 130, Peruvian Economic Association.
    9. David Perez-Reyna & Filippo Rebessi, 2018. "Devaluations and Growth: The Role of Financial Development," 2018 Meeting Papers 1118, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    10. Gnangnon, Sèna Kimm, 2019. "Financial Development and Tax Revenue in Developing Countries: Investigating the International Trade and Economic Growth Channels," EconStor Preprints 206628, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics.

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