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Credit Market Imperfections and Patterns of International Trade and Capital Flows

  • Kiminori Matsuyama

This paper offers two simple models to illustrate how corporate governance, contractual enforcement, and the balance sheet condition of the business sector etc., can affect the patterns of international trade and capital flows in the presence of credit market imperfections. (JEL: D52, F15, F21, F40) Copyright (c) 2005 The European Economic Association.

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Paper provided by Northwestern University, Center for Mathematical Studies in Economics and Management Science in its series Discussion Papers with number 1389.

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Date of creation: Jul 2004
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:nwu:cmsems:1389
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  1. Acemoglu, Daron & Zilibotti, Fabrizio, 1996. "Was Prometheus Unbound by Chance? Risk, Diversification and Growth," CEPR Discussion Papers 1426, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. Martin, Philippe & Rey, Hélène, 2000. "Financial Super-Markets: Size Matters for Asset Trade," Center for International and Development Economics Research, Working Paper Series qt0dr2z6p9, Center for International and Development Economics Research, Institute for Business and Economic Research, UC Berkeley.
  3. Beck, Thorsten, 2002. "Financial development and international trade: Is there a link?," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(1), pages 107-131, June.
  4. Robert Townsend, 1979. "Optimal contracts and competitive markets with costly state verification," Staff Report 45, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
  5. Kletzer, Kenneth & Bardhan, Pranab, 1986. "Credit Markets and Patterns of International Trade," Department of Economics, Working Paper Series qt1g36f3sd, Department of Economics, Institute for Business and Economic Research, UC Berkeley.
  6. Gertler, Mark & Rogoff, Kenneth, 1990. "North-South lending and endogenous domestic capital market inefficiencies," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(2), pages 245-266, October.
  7. Holmström, Bengt & Tirole, Jean, 1994. "Financial Intermediation, Loanable Funds and the Real Sector," IDEI Working Papers 40, Institut d'Économie Industrielle (IDEI), Toulouse.
  8. Boyd, John H. & Smith, Bruce D., 1997. "Capital Market Imperfections, International Credit Markets, and Nonconvergence," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 73(2), pages 335-364, April.
  9. Kiminori Matsuyama, 2001. "On the Rise and Fall of Class Societies," Discussion Papers 1326, Northwestern University, Center for Mathematical Studies in Economics and Management Science.
  10. Lucas, Robert E, Jr, 1990. "Why Doesn't Capital Flow from Rich to Poor Countries?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 80(2), pages 92-96, May.
  11. Kiminori Matsuyama, 2001. "Good and Bad Investment: An Inquiry into the Causes of Credit Cycles," Discussion Papers 1335, Northwestern University, Center for Mathematical Studies in Economics and Management Science, revised Sep 2001.
  12. Kiminori Matsuyama, 2004. "Financial Market Globalization, Symmetry-Breaking, and Endogenous Inequality of Nations," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 72(3), pages 853-884, 05.
  13. R. Dornbusch & S. Fischer & P. A. Samuelson, 1976. "Comparative Advantage, Trade and Payments in a Ricardian Model With a Continuum of Goods," Working papers 178, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
  14. Munetomo Ando & Noriyuki Yanagawa, 2004. "Cost of Enforcement in Developing Countries with Credit Market Imperfection," CIRJE F-Series CIRJE-F-276, CIRJE, Faculty of Economics, University of Tokyo.
  15. Oliver Hart & John Moore, 1991. "A Theory of Debt Based on the Inalienability of Human Capital," NBER Working Papers 3906, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  16. Kiminori Matsuyama, 2007. "Credit Traps and Credit Cycles," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 97(1), pages 503-516, March.
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