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Consumption, Wealth, Stock and Housing Returns: Evidence from Emerging Markets

In this paper, we show, using the consumer’s budget constraint, that the residuals of the trend relationship among consumption, aggregate wealth, and labour income should predict both stock returns and housing returns. We use quarterly data for a panel of 31 emerging economies and find that, when agents expect future stock returns to be higher, they will temporarily allow consumption to rise. Regarding housing returns, if housing assets are complementary to stocks, then investors react in the same way. If, however, the increase in the exposure through risky assets is achieved by lowering the share of wealth held in the form of housing (i.e., when stock and housing assets are substitutes), then they will temporarily reduce their consumption.

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File URL: http://www3.eeg.uminho.pt/economia/nipe/docs/2011/NIPE_WP_32_2011.pdf
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Paper provided by NIPE - Universidade do Minho in its series NIPE Working Papers with number 32/2011.

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Date of creation: 2011
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Handle: RePEc:nip:nipewp:32/2011
Contact details of provider: Postal: Núcleo de Investigação em Políticas Económicas, Escola de Economia e Gestão, Universidade do Minho, P-4710-057 Braga, Portugal
Phone: +351-253604510 ext 5532
Fax: +351-253601380
Web page: http://www3.eeg.uminho.pt/economia/nipe/versao_inglesa/index_uk.htm
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  33. repec:fth:harver:1435 is not listed on IDEAS
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