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Consumption, Wealth, Stock and Government Bond Returns: International Evidence

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Abstract

In this paper, we show, from the consumer’s budget constraint, that the residuals of the trend relationship among consumption, aggregate wealth, and labour income should predict both stock returns and government bond yields. We use data for several OECD countries and find that when agents expect future stock returns to be higher, they will temporarily allow consumption to rise. Regarding government bond yields, when bonds are seen as a component of asset wealth, then investors react in the same way. If, however, the increase in the yields is perceived as signalling a future rise in taxes, then they will temporarily reduce their consumption.

Suggested Citation

  • António Afonso & Ricardo M. Sousa, 2011. "Consumption, Wealth, Stock and Government Bond Returns: International Evidence," NIPE Working Papers 09/2011, NIPE - Universidade do Minho.
  • Handle: RePEc:nip:nipewp:09/2011
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    File URL: http://www3.eeg.uminho.pt/economia/nipe/docs/2011/NIPE_WP_09_2011.pdf
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    1. Ricardo M. Sousa, 2009. "What Are The Wealth E¤ects Of Monetary Policy?," NIPE Working Papers 26/2009, NIPE - Universidade do Minho.
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    Cited by:

    1. Caporale, Guglielmo Maria & Sousa, Ricardo M., 2016. "Consumption, wealth, stock and housing returns: Evidence from emerging markets," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, pages 562-578.
    2. Goodness C. Aye & Rangan Gupta & Mampho P. Modise, 2015. "Do Stock Prices Impact Consumption and Interest Rate in South Africa? Evidence from a Time-varying Vector Autoregressive Model," Journal of Emerging Market Finance, Institute for Financial Management and Research, vol. 14(2), pages 176-196, August.
    3. Christina Christou & Rangan Gupta & Fredj Jawadi, 2017. "Does Inequality Help in Forecasting Equity Premium in a Panel of G7 Countries?," Working Papers 201720, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
    4. Barrell, Ray & Costantini, Mauro & Meco, Iris, 2015. "Housing wealth, financial wealth, and consumption: New evidence for Italy and the UK," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 316-323.
    5. Balcilar, Mehmet & Gupta, Rangan & Sousa, Ricardo M. & Wohar, Mark E., 2017. "Do cay and cayMS predict stock and housing returns? Evidence from a nonparametric causality test," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 269-279.
    6. Rudan Wang & Bruce Morley & Javier Ordóñez, 2015. "The Taylor Rule, Wealth Effects and the Exchange Rate," Working Papers 2015/08, Economics Department, Universitat Jaume I, Castellón (Spain).
    7. Tsai, I-Chun, 2015. "Dynamic information transfer in the United States housing and stock markets," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 215-230.
    8. Tsangyao Chang & Rangan Gupta & Anandamayee Majumdar & Christian Pierdzioch, 2017. "Predicting Stock Market Movements with a Time-Varying Consumption-Aggregate Wealth Ratio," Working Papers 201756, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
    9. Rocha Armada, Manuel J. & Sousa, Ricardo M. & Wohar, Mark E., 2015. "Consumption growth, preference for smoothing, changes in expectations and risk premium," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 80-97.
    10. Xu, Yuan, 2015. "Robustness to model uncertainty and the nominal term premium puzzle," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 124-137.
    11. Ren, Yu & Yuan, Yufei & Zhang, Yang, 2014. "Human capital, household capital and asset returns," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 11-22.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    consumption; wealth; stock returns; bond returns.;

    JEL classification:

    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis

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