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Inflation targeting makes the difference: Novel evidence on inflation stabilization

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  • Bleich, Dirk
  • Fendel, Ralf
  • Rülke, Jan-Christoph

Abstract

Though Svensson (1997, 2003) provides theoretical evidence that the introduction of inflation targeting is consistent with an inflation stabilizing monetary policy, empirical evidence that the introduction of inflation targeting actually changes central bank’s behavior is still missing. This paper aims to close this gap and estimates forward-looking monetary policy rules for 20 inflation targeting countries. To this end, we use a data set which is available to the central bank in real-time, published on a frequently basis, comparable among all countries, and which includes the periods before and after the introduction of inflation targeting. We find that the introduction of inflation targeting significantly shifts the central bank’s reaction function toward inflation stabilizing. We also provide evidence of time-varying effects and find that central banks stabilize inflation once inflation targeting is introduced. We take our results as strong evidence that the introduction of inflation targeting makes the difference for monetary policy strategies.

Suggested Citation

  • Bleich, Dirk & Fendel, Ralf & Rülke, Jan-Christoph, 2012. "Inflation targeting makes the difference: Novel evidence on inflation stabilization," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 31(5), pages 1092-1105.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jimfin:v:31:y:2012:i:5:p:1092-1105
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jimonfin.2011.12.012
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Pierdzioch, Christian & Rülke, Jan-Christoph, 2013. "Do inflation targets anchor inflation expectations?," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 214-223.
    2. Pierre-Richard Agénor & Luiz A. Pereira da Silva, 2013. "Inflation Targeting and Financial Stability: A Perspective from the Developing World," Working Papers Series 324, Central Bank of Brazil, Research Department.
    3. Dirk Bleich & Ralf Fendel & Jan-Christoph Rülke, 2013. "Monetary Policy and Stock Market Volatility," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 33(3), pages 1669-1680.
    4. Michael Ehrmann, 2015. "Targeting Inflation from Below: How Do Inflation Expectations Behave?," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 11(4), pages 213-249, September.
    5. Hippolyte W. Balima & Eric G. Kilama & Rene Tapsoba, 2017. "Settling the Inflation Targeting Debate: Lights from a Meta-Regression Analysis," IMF Working Papers 17/213, International Monetary Fund.
    6. Kempa, Bernd & Riedel, Jana, 2013. "Nonlinearities in exchange rate determination in a small open economy: Some evidence for Canada," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 268-278.
    7. Alexandru MINEA & Jean-Louis COMBES & Weneyam Hippolyte BALIMA, 2015. "Sovereign Debt Risk in Emerging Countries: Does Inflation Targeting Adoption Make Any Difference?," Working Papers 201504, CERDI.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Monetary policy; Taylor rule; Inflation targeting;

    JEL classification:

    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • D84 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Expectations; Speculations
    • C33 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models

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