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Integrated Epi-Econ Assessment

Author

Listed:
  • Timo Boppart
  • Karl Harmenberg
  • John Hassler
  • Per Krusell
  • Jonna Olsson

Abstract

We formulate an economic time use model and add to it an epidemiological SIR block. In the event of an epidemic, households shift their leisure time from activities with a high degree of social interaction to activities with less, and also choose to work more from home. Our model highlights the different actions taken by young individuals, who are less severely affected by the disease, and by old individuals, who are more vulnerable. We calibrate our model to time use data from ATUS, employment data, epidemiological data, and estimates of the value of a statistical life. There are qualitative as well as quantitative differences between the competitive equilibrium and social planner allocation and, moreover, these depend critically on when a cure arrives. Due to the role played by social activities in people's welfare, simple indicators such as deaths and GDP are insuffcient for judging outcomes in our economy.

Suggested Citation

  • Timo Boppart & Karl Harmenberg & John Hassler & Per Krusell & Jonna Olsson, 2020. "Integrated Epi-Econ Assessment," NBER Working Papers 28282, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:28282
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    Cited by:

    1. Giorgio Fabbri & Salvatore Federico & Davide Fiaschi & Fausto Gozzi, 2021. "Mobilty Decisions, Economic Dynamics and Epidemic," LIDAM Discussion Papers IRES 2021017, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
    2. Ester Faia & Marianna Kudlyak & Ekaterina Shabalina, 2021. "Dynamic Labor Reallocation with Heterogeneous Skills and Uninsured Idiosyncratic Risk," Working Paper Series 2021-16, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.

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    JEL classification:

    • E10 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - General
    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General

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