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History as Evolution

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  • Nathan Nunn

Abstract

In this chapter, I consider the benefits of viewing history through an evolutionary lens. In recent decades, a field of research has emerged, which builds on foundations from biological evolution to study culture within an evolutionary framework. I begin the chapter by discussing the theory behind cultural evolution and the empirical evidence supporting its ability to explain the history of human societies. I then turn to a discussion of how an evolutionary perspective provides important insights into a range of phenomena within economics, including a deeper understanding of human capital, innovation, gender roles, the consequences of warfare, the effects of market competition, why we observe historical persistence and path dependence, and, most importantly, why sustained economic growth is often so elusive. I end by turning to a summary of a growing body of research within economics that has made progress in improving our understanding of cultural evolution and, thus, contributing to evolutionary disciplines outside of economics.

Suggested Citation

  • Nathan Nunn, 2020. "History as Evolution," NBER Working Papers 27706, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:27706
    Note: DAE DEV EFG POL
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Beiron, Johanna & Montañés, Rubén M. & Normann, Fredrik & Johnsson, Filip, 2020. "Combined heat and power operational modes for increased product flexibility in a waste incineration plant," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 202(C).
    2. Olympios, Andreas V. & Pantaleo, Antonio M. & Sapin, Paul & Markides, Christos N., 2020. "On the value of combined heat and power (CHP) systems and heat pumps incentralised and distributed heating systems: Lessons from multi-fidelitymodelling approaches," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 274(C).

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C73 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Stochastic and Dynamic Games; Evolutionary Games
    • N01 - Economic History - - General - - - Development of the Discipline: Historiographical; Sources and Methods
    • N10 - Economic History - - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics; Industrial Structure; Growth; Fluctuations - - - General, International, or Comparative
    • Z1 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics

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