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Kinship, Cooperation, and the Evolution of Moral Systems

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  • Benjamin Enke

Abstract

Across the social sciences, a key question is how societies manage to enforce cooperative behavior in social dilemmas such as public goods provision or bilateral trade. According to an influential body of theories in psychology, anthropology, and evolutionary biology, the answer is that humans have evolved moral systems: packages of functional psychological and biological mechanisms that regulate economic behavior, including a belief in moralizing gods; moral values; negative reciprocity; and emotions of shame, guilt, and disgust. Based on a stylized model, this paper empirically studies the structure and evolution of these moral traits as a function of historical heterogeneity in extended kinship relationships. The evidence shows that societies with a historically tightly-knit kinship structure regulate behavior through communal moral values; revenge taking; emotions of external shame; and notions of purity and disgust. In loose kinship societies, on the other hand, cooperation appears to be enforced through universal moral values; internalized guilt; altruistic punishment; and an apparent rise and fall of moralizing religions. These patterns point to the presence of internally consistent, but culturally variable, functional moral systems. Consistent with the model, the relationship between kinship ties, economic development, and the structure of the mediating moral systems amplified over time.

Suggested Citation

  • Benjamin Enke, 2017. "Kinship, Cooperation, and the Evolution of Moral Systems," NBER Working Papers 23499, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:23499
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    Cited by:

    1. Paola Giuliano & Nathan Nunn, 2018. "Ancestral Characteristics of Modern Populations," Economic History of Developing Regions, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 33(1), pages 1-17, January.
    2. Nathan Nunn & Nancy Qian & Jaya Wen, 2018. "Distrust and Political Turnover," NBER Working Papers 24187, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Artavia-Mora, Luis & Bedi, Arjun S. & Rieger, Matthias, 2018. "Help, Prejudice and Headscarves," IZA Discussion Papers 11460, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Johannes C. Buggle, 2017. "Irrigation, Collectivism and Long-Run Technological Divergence," Cahiers de Recherches Economiques du Département d'Econométrie et d'Economie politique (DEEP) 17.06, Université de Lausanne, Faculté des HEC, DEEP.
    5. Samuel Bazzi & Martin Fiszbein & Mesay Gebresilasse, 2018. "Frontier Culture: The Roots and Persistence of “Rugged Individualism†in the United States," Boston University - Department of Economics - Working Papers Series dp-302, Boston University - Department of Economics.

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    JEL classification:

    • D0 - Microeconomics - - General
    • O0 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - General

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