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Giving Voice to Employees and Spreading Information within the Firm: the Manner Matters

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  • Enzo Valentini

    (University of Macerata)

Abstract

Economists are paying increasing attention to “factors” in job satisfaction. Job satisfaction can affect productivity, effort, absenteeism, and quits. This paper analyzes data from the “Working in Britain, 2000” questionnaire; the results confirm the effects of individual features on job satisfaction, as highlighted in previous studies. The analysis shows that job satisfaction can be enhanced by spreading information within the organization and by giving voice to employees, but the management must choose communication strategies perceived as reliable by the employees.

Suggested Citation

  • Enzo Valentini, 2011. "Giving Voice to Employees and Spreading Information within the Firm: the Manner Matters," Working Papers 36-2011, Macerata University, Department of Studies on Economic Development (DiSSE), revised May 2011.
  • Handle: RePEc:mcr:wpaper:wpaper00036
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Human Resource Management; Job satisfaction; gift exchange; employees’ voice; procedural utility;

    JEL classification:

    • J28 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Safety; Job Satisfaction; Related Public Policy
    • J53 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor-Management Relations, Trade Unions, and Collective Bargaining - - - Labor-Management Relations; Industrial Jurisprudence
    • D23 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Organizational Behavior; Transaction Costs; Property Rights

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