IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Arbeitszufriedenheit im internationalen Vergleich

  • Dominik Hanglberger

    ()

    (LEUPHANA University Lüneburg,Department of Economic, Behaviour and Law Sciences, Research Institute on Professions (Forschungsinstitut Freie Berufe (FFB)))

The purpose of this paper is to compare the extent and determinants of employees’ job satisfaction on a European level. The underlying data originate from the European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS) 2005 covering 31 European countries. Beside detailed information about type of work and working conditions the data account for personal and household characteristics including objective and subjective income measures. The result from Ordered-probit regressions for all 31 countries as well as separate regressions for five groups of countries (clustered with respect to level of welfare and type of welfare state) indicate a diversified pattern of explanation of job satisfaction. For all analyzed countries except for countries in Scandinavia and continental Europe the employees’ subjective evaluation of income appears to have the strongest effect on job satisfaction. Considering the conflict of working hours with private life, the negative effect on job satisfaction is less distinctive in countries with a lower welfare level. Job security is found to have a stronger impact for UK and Ireland, whereas work autonomy is only found to be among the top ten influences for high level welfare states (UK, Ireland, continental Europe, and Scandinavia).

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://www.leuphana.de/fileadmin/user_upload/Forschungseinrichtungen/ffb/files/publikationen/diskussion/DP_86_-_Arbeitszufriedenheit_im_internationalen_Vergleich.pdf
File Function: First version, 2011
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by Research Institute on Professions (Forschungsinstitut Freie Berufe (FFB)), LEUPHANA University Lüneburg in its series FFB-Discussionpaper with number 86.

as
in new window

Length: 43 pages
Date of creation: Jan 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:leu:wpaper:86
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://ffb.uni-lueneburg.de/repec/leu/

More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. repec:ese:iserwp:2006-42 is not listed on IDEAS
  2. Herrmann, Harald, 2007. "Freie Berufe – Europäische Entwicklungen," MPRA Paper 9036, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  3. Joachim Merz & Peter Paul Böhm & Derik Burgert, 2005. "Arbeitszeitarrangements und Entlohnung - Ein Treatment-Effects-Ansatz für Freiberufler, Unternehmer und abhängig Beschäftigte," FFB-Discussionpaper 50, Research Institute on Professions (Forschungsinstitut Freie Berufe (FFB)), LEUPHANA University Lüneburg.
  4. Merz, Joachim & Burgert, Derik, 2003. "Working Hour Arrangements and Working Hours A Microeconometric Analysis Based on German Time Diary Data," MPRA Paper 5979, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  5. Joachim Merz, 2002. "Zur Kumulation von Haushaltsstichproben," FFB-Discussionpaper 37, Research Institute on Professions (Forschungsinstitut Freie Berufe (FFB)), LEUPHANA University Lüneburg.
  6. Sousa-Poza, Alfonso & Sousa-Poza, Andres A., 2000. "Well-being at work: a cross-national analysis of the levels and determinants of job satisfaction," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 517-538, November.
  7. Dominik Hanglberger, 2010. "Arbeitszufriedenheit und flexible Arbeitszeiten – Empirische Analyse mit Daten des Sozio-oekonomischen Panels," FFB-Discussionpaper 80, Research Institute on Professions (Forschungsinstitut Freie Berufe (FFB)), LEUPHANA University Lüneburg.
  8. Anna Cristina D’Addio & Tor Eriksson & Paul Frijters, 2003. "An Analysis of the Determinants of Job Satisfaction when Individuals’ Baseline Satisfaction Levels May Differ," CAM Working Papers 2003-16, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics. Centre for Applied Microeconometrics.
  9. Kristensen, Nicolai & Johansson, Edvard, 2008. "New evidence on cross-country differences in job satisfaction using anchoring vignettes," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 96-117, February.
  10. Österbacka, Eva & Merz, Joachim & Zick, Cathleen D., 2010. "Human Capital Investments in Children: A Comparative Analysis of the Role of Parent-Child Shared Time in Selected Countries," IZA Discussion Papers 5084, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  11. Keith A. Bender & Susan M. Donohue & John S. Heywood, 2005. "Job satisfaction and gender segregation," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 57(3), pages 479-496, July.
  12. Clark, Andrew E., 2001. "What really matters in a job? Hedonic measurement using quit data," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(2), pages 223-242, May.
  13. Clark, Andrew E. & Oswald, Andrew J., 1996. "Satisfaction and comparison income," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(3), pages 359-381, September.
  14. Richard B. Freeman, 1977. "Job Satisfaction as an Economic Variable," NBER Working Papers 0225, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  15. Joachim Merz & Paul Böhm & Derik Burgert, 2009. "Timing and fragmentation of daily working hours arrangements and income inequality – An earnings treatment effects approach with German time use diary data," electronic International Journal of Time Use Research, Research Institute on Professions (Forschungsinstitut Freie Berufe (FFB)) and The International Association for Time Use Research (IATUR), vol. 6(2), pages 200-239, September.
  16. Merz, Joachim & Burgert, Derik, 2003. "Working Hour Arrangements and Working Hours – A Microeconometric Analysis Based on German Time Use Diary Data," IZA Discussion Papers 922, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  17. George A. Akerlof & Andrew K. Rose & Janet L. Yellen, 1988. "Job Switching and Job Satisfaction in the U.S. Labor Market," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 19(2), pages 495-594.
  18. Herrmann, Harald, 2007. "Freie Berufe- Europäische Entwicklungen
    [Liberal Professions - European Development]
    ," MPRA Paper 16298, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  19. Clark, Andrew E., 1997. "Job satisfaction and gender: Why are women so happy at work?," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 4(4), pages 341-372, December.
  20. Daniel S. Hamermesh, 2001. "The Changing Distribution of Job Satisfaction," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 36(1), pages 1-30.
  21. Federica Origo & Laura Pagani, 2006. "Is Work Flexibility a Stairway to Heaven? The Story Told by Job Satisfaction in Europ," Working Papers 97, University of Milano-Bicocca, Department of Economics, revised Jun 2006.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:leu:wpaper:86. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Joachim Merz)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.