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The effect of Extracurricular Activities on Students’ Dropout. Evidence from Vocational Education in Italy

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  • Rossella Iraci Capuccinello
  • Giuseppe Migali

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Suggested Citation

  • Rossella Iraci Capuccinello & Giuseppe Migali, 2018. "The effect of Extracurricular Activities on Students’ Dropout. Evidence from Vocational Education in Italy," Working Papers 232397381, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.
  • Handle: RePEc:lan:wpaper:232397381
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    File URL: http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/media/lancaster-university/content-assets/documents/lums/economics/working-papers/LancasterWP2018_006.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. A. Smith, Jeffrey & E. Todd, Petra, 2005. "Does matching overcome LaLonde's critique of nonexperimental estimators?," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 125(1-2), pages 305-353.
    2. repec:oup:qjecon:v:132:y:2017:i:1:p:1-54. is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Becker, Sascha O. & Caliendo, Marco, 2007. "mhbounds – Sensitivity Analysis for Average Treatment Effects," IZA Discussion Papers 2542, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Silles, Mary A., 2009. "The causal effect of education on health: Evidence from the United Kingdom," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 122-128, February.
    5. Ralph Stinebrickner & Todd Stinebrickner, 2014. "Academic Performance and College Dropout: Using Longitudinal Expectations Data to Estimate a Learning Model," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 32(3), pages 601-644.
    6. Sauro Mocetti, 2012. "Educational choices and the selection process: before and after compulsory schooling," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(2), pages 189-209, February.
    7. repec:eee:joepsy:v:62:y:2017:i:c:p:98-119 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Todd Stinebrickner & Ralph Stinebrickner, 2012. "Learning about Academic Ability and the College Dropout Decision," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 30(4), pages 707-748.
    9. Lance Lochner & Enrico Moretti, 2004. "The Effect of Education on Crime: Evidence from Prison Inmates, Arrests, and Self-Reports," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(1), pages 155-189, March.
    10. Massimiliano Bratti, 2007. "Parents’ income and children’s school drop-out at 16 in England and Wales: evidence from the 1970 British Cohort Study," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 5(1), pages 15-40, March.
    11. Ermisch, John & Francesconi, Marco, 2001. "Family Matters: Impacts of Family Background on Educational Attainments," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 68(270), pages 137-156, May.
    12. Philip Oreopoulos, 2006. "The compelling effects of compulsory schooling: evidence from Canada," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 39(1), pages 22-52, February.
    13. Dominique Goux & Marc Gurgand & Eric Maurin, 2017. "Adjusting Your Dreams? High School Plans and Dropout Behaviour," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 127(602), pages 1025-1046, June.
    14. Oreopoulos, Philip, 2007. "Do dropouts drop out too soon? Wealth, health and happiness from compulsory schooling," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(11-12), pages 2213-2229, December.
    15. Becker, Sascha O. & Caliendo, Marco, 2007. "Sensitivity analysis for average treatment effects," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 0(Number 1), pages 1-13.
    16. James Heckman & Hidehiko Ichimura & Jeffrey Smith & Petra Todd, 1998. "Characterizing Selection Bias Using Experimental Data," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 66(5), pages 1017-1098, September.
    17. Jaeger, David A & Page, Marianne E, 1996. "Degrees Matter: New Evidence on Sheepskin Effects in the Returns to Education," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 78(4), pages 733-740, November.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    High school dropout; Extracurricular Activities; Student Engagement; Propensity score matching;

    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy

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