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Charitable Giving Among Females and Males: An Empirical Test of the Competitive Altruism Hypothesis

  • Robert Böhm

    (Center for Empirical Research in Economics and Behavioral Sciences (CEREB), University of Erfurt, Germany)

  • Tobias Regner

    ()

    (Max Planck Institute of Economics, Jena, Germany)

We conduct a real-effort task experiment where subjects' performance translates into a donation to a charity. In a within-subjects design we vary the visibility of the donation (no/private/public feedback). Confirming previous studies, we find that subjects' performance increases, that is, they donate more to charity, when their relative performance is made public. In line with the competitive altruism hypothesis, a biology-based explanation for status-seeking behavior, especially male subjects increase performance in the public setting.

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Paper provided by Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Max-Planck-Institute of Economics in its series Jena Economic Research Papers with number 2012-038.

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Date of creation: 09 Jul 2012
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Handle: RePEc:jrp:jrpwrp:2012-038
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