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Earnings Differentials and Returns to Education in China, 1995-2008

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Listed:
  • Cui, Yuling

    () (Macquarie University, Sydney)

  • Nahm, Daehoon

    () (Macquarie University, Sydney)

  • Tani, Massimiliano

    () (University of New South Wales)

Abstract

This paper estimates the returns to education of rural-urban migrants during the period of transition of China's economy between 1995 and 2008. Using data from CHIP and RUMiC, we find that rural migrants' earning differentials with urban residents are substantial and mainly depend on the type of occupation, industry, and employers' ownership, rather than the level of education completed. Returns to formal schooling for migrants remained stable at approximately 3% and 5% throughout the period, and differences across quantiles are generally statistically insignificant. Increasing gaps in the return to schooling by gender have instead emerged. These results raise questions about the incentives to invest in human capital for rural migrants and for the governments funding education in emigration regions.

Suggested Citation

  • Cui, Yuling & Nahm, Daehoon & Tani, Massimiliano, 2013. "Earnings Differentials and Returns to Education in China, 1995-2008," IZA Discussion Papers 7349, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp7349
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Chris SAKELLARIOU & Fang ZHENG, 2014. "Returns to Schooling for Urban Residents and Migrants in China: New IV Estimates and a Comprehensive Investigation," Economic Growth Centre Working Paper Series 1407, Nanyang Technological University, School of Social Sciences, Economic Growth Centre.
    2. Song, Ze & Li, Lianyou & Ma, Chao, 2013. "The EASI Demand System : Evidence from China Household," MPRA Paper 48435, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Li, Lianyou & Song, Ze & Ma, Chao, 2015. "Engel curves and price elasticity in urban Chinese Households," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 236-242.
    4. Mehtap Akgüç & Corrado Giulietti & Klaus Zimmermann, 2014. "The RUMiC longitudinal survey: fostering research on labor markets in China," IZA Journal of Labor & Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 3(1), pages 1-14, December.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    returns to education; rural migrants; quantile regression; ownership enterprises; China; returns to schooling;

    JEL classification:

    • C31 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models; Quantile Regressions; Social Interaction Models
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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